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Tag Archives: Technology and innovation

Is Industrial Policy Finally Legitimate?

Yves here. It’s become more and more respectable in development economic circles to acknowledge that formerly taboo ideas like trade barriers and other forms of support to emerging industries are sound policy. The reversal by the IMF on the value of industrial policy is nevertheless significant. And that’s before you get to the fact that countries that lack explicit industrial policy wind up having ones by defaul By Jomo Kwame Sundaram, a former economics professor, was Assistant...

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Why Busy-Ness Is So Damaging

Yves here. While the “busy-ness” trope is cute, it also has the effect of trivializing the problem it discusses. We’re in the midst of major changes in our social order due to the information revolution, as significant as the ones that Karl Polanyi described in his classic The Great Transformation. It appears to be an unfortunate accident of history that this technology change really got going as neoliberal values became firmly entrenched, particularly in the work place. It isn’t just that...

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Takers and Makers: Who Are the Real Value Creators?

By Mariana Mazzucato, Professor of the Economics of Innovation at the Science Policy Research Unit of the University of Sussex. Author of The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths. Twitter: @MazzucatoM. Adapted from The Value of Everything by Mariana Mazzucato. Copyright © 2018 by Penguin Random House UK. ; originally published at Evonomics We often hear businesses, entrepreneurs or sectors talking about themselves as ‘wealth-creating’. The contexts may differ –...

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Design Genius Jony Ive Leaves Apple, Leaving Behind Crapified Products That Cannot Be Repaired

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Last week’s announcement of the departure of Apple chief design officer Jony Ive marks the end of an era: the last connection to the Apple of Steve Jobs. Now, no one would deny that Ive created beautiful objects. As iFixit notes: The iPod, the iPhone, the MacBook Air, the physical Apple Store, even the iconic packaging of Apple products—these products...

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Five Things We Found In The FDA’s Hidden Device Database

By Sydney Lupkin, Data Correspondent, covers drug prices and specializes in data reporting for the KHN enterprise team. Originally published at Kaiser Health News. [UPDATED at 1:30 p.m. ET] After two decades of keeping the public in the dark about millions of medical device malfunctions and injuries, the Food and Drug Administration has published the once hidden database online, revealing 5.7 million incidents publicly for the first time. The newfound transparency follows a Kaiser Health...

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The Individual Costs of Occupational Decline

Yves here. You have to read a bit into this article on occupational decline, aka, “What happens to me after the robots take my job?” to realize that the authors studied Swedish workers. One has to think that the findings would be more pronounced in the US, due both to pronounced regional and urban/rural variations, as well as the weakness of social institutions in the US. While there may be small cities in Sweden that have been hit hard by the decline of a key employer, I don’t have the...

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California’s Solar Energy Problem

I’m sticking out my neck a bit in commenting on this detailed analysis of California’s current and likely future energy mix, and why its heavy emphasis on solar is not a good idea. The video is short and information-rich, making good use of graphics, and a lot of the data displays would be lost in a transcript, so it’s worth watching. However, because it is so data driven, it buries its conclusions. The video shows that over-reliance on solar undermines its economic attractiveness because it...

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Boeing Sells 0 Planes on First Day of Paris Air Show v. 123 for Airbus, Yet Boeing Still Pushing for More Weakening of FAA Standards Via Greater Use of Computer Testing

Boeing execs must be smoking something very strong. The manufacturer first tried blaming pilots for its two 737 Max crashes, even after groundings by airline regulators showed they thought something was wrong with the plane. Even as of this week, CEO Dennis Muilenberg has only gone as far as admitting to being “not consistent” in how Boeing conveyed information to regulators, airlines, and the public. And the apology was limited to the aircraft lights! Muilenburg is still standing because he...

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Why Boeing May Never Recover From Its 737 Debacle

Lambert here: Yes, but is there a better way to cut back on air travel than to launch demonstrably lethal civilian aircraft? Let’s look on the bright side. By Marshall Auerback, a market analyst and commentator. This article was produced by Economy for All, a project of the Independent Media Institute. Most of us are familiar with the acronym “FUBAR.” A recent New York Times article on the Boeing 737 fiasco provides a perfect illustration of the concept. We’re now learning that the company...

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Is Geoengineering the Answer to the Climate Crisis?

Yves here. It’s not hard to anticipate that geoengineering will be the answer to the climate crisis, whether it is adequately tested or not. There isn’t enough time to reach a consensus in the US, let alone other big carbon-spewing nations, to implement the massive economic reordering that would need to take place (including cutting a lot of current consumption). Given how difficult it will foresee knock-on effects, along with high odds that some types of geoengineering aren’t easily...

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