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Tag Archives: Social values

DoJ Bankruptcy Trustee Lambastes Provisions to Protect Sacklers in Purdue Bankruptcy Exit Plan as “Illegal”

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Last week, when I last wrote about the Purdue bankruptcy exit plan, it looked like the Sackler family would get to keep most of their fortune, and receive immunity from third-party lawsuits for claims related to the role they played in the opioids epidemic. Fifteen states had signalled, including previous stalwarts of state opioids litigation...

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Mindfulness Meditation Can Make Some Americans More Selfish and Less Generous

Yves here. Before some of you get riled up, I was involved with a mindfulness group that used techniques other than meditation (they focused on being mindful on an active basis, or as they liked to put it, “clear,” “awake,” “aware”). Their implicit pitch, which for most participants seemed to be true, was not that their training made you a better person, in the sense of being more ethical or generous, but that it made you more effective. They promoted it as a way to get yourself out of dead...

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Far More Adults Don’t Want Children Than Previously Thought

Yves here. Given that it’s not socially acceptable in many quarters to say you don’t want to have kids, I suspect that the number of people who would rather not be parents is higher than this survey shows, and also higher historically than past polls would indicate. I know my parents had children because they were expected to, and explicitly to help my father’s career. A childless couple in the 1950s had to ‘splain themselves. And of course there was also the lack of cheap effective birth...

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The Climate Emergency Calls for a New Approach to Mental Health

Yves here. I don’t mean to sound churlish, but devastation is a regular feature of human experience. It’s not hard to make a list. The firebombings of World War II. The Black Plague. The Mongol conquests. The US naplaming much of Laos. One can argue that the purpose of major religions is to reconcile humans to the inevitability of suffering and death. So the focus on mental health costs of climate disasters, in your humble blogger’s opinion, is a reflection of poor social health going into...

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Supreme Court Rules 9-0 Against NCAA, Opening Door to Further Antitrust Challenges of Student-Athlete Compensation Bans

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. The United States Supreme Court  unanimously ruled Monday that the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) cannot prohibit its member schools from providing athletes with certain forms of education-related benefits, including paid post-graduate internships, graduate school scholarships, or free laptops or musical instruments. The Supreme Court...

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‘Managed Retreat’ from Climate Disasters Can Reinvent Cities So They’re Better for Everyone – and Avoid More Flooding, Heat and Fires

Yves here. Sadly many sound ideas never get implemented (or not much) because they require things that neoliberal-infested societies are bad at, like consensus and leadership. If the advanced economy “we” can’t muster sound responses to an urgent threat like Covid and muster popular support, how are they going to make the adjustments (as in sacrifices) needed to deal with rising sea levels? By A.R. Siders, Assistant Professor, Disaster Research Center, University of Delaware and Katharine...

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Standard Inflation Theory Leaves Out Social Conflict and Costs

By Lance Taylor, Arnhold Professor of International Cooperation and Development, New School for Social Research, and Nelson Henrique Barbosa Filho, Professor, FGV and the University of Brasilia. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking website Pontification about inflation of prices of goods and services is on a rampage. Almost all the noise is based on inadequate inflation theory. A more complete approach is presented at length in Taylor and Barbosa-Filho (2021) and...

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A Nation that Runs on Bribes: Civics Lessons from our Vaccine Rollout

By Lambert Strether of Corrente Bloomberg’s headline is forthright: “Bribing People to Get Vaccines Just Might Be Working in U.S.” In this short post, I’ll try to tease out some of the civics lessons of the vaccine rollout — normalizing bribery among them. I don’t mean to moralize; after all, I supported Operation Warp Speed, even though it would obviously empower Big Pharma, because “given the givens” it was the best way to get “jabs into arms” as rapidly as possible (and possibly we could...

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Head Start’s Long-Run Impacts on Human Capital and Labor-Market Outcomes

By Martha J. Bailey, Professor, Department of Economics, University of California-Los Angeles, Shuqiao Sun, Economist, World Bank, and Brenden Timpe, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Nebraska. Originally published at VoxEU. Preschool attendance in the US is largely funded by parents, which means that the children of more affluent and educated parents are more likely to attend. This column looks at the impact of Head Start, a large-scale preschool programme that serves roughly 1...

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Ranked Choice and Most-Least Voting

Yves here. America’s simple two-party system means we are unfamiliar with coalition strategies and complex preference-registering systems. Some of them like ranked choice are starting to be adopted in the US. Our Terry Flynn digs into where two approaches, ranked choice and more-least, produce similar and divergent results. By Terry Flynn, an NC regular who writes at Terry Flynn PhD and thinks hard and rigorously about matters like polling, voting, and other real-life areas where the...

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