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Tag Archives: Social values

Riot or Resistance? How Media Frames Unrest in Minneapolis Will Shape Public’s View of Protest

Yves here. Good to see actual data that shows the considerable difference between how the press treated the pink pussyhats, versus both people of color and whites protesting police violence against blacks. But the media isn’t the only part of the problem. Recall that when Black Lives Matter die-ins were becoming popular and getting media attention, the Democratic party managed to infiltrate many Black Lives Matter groups and the die-ins died off (Lambert chronicled this back in the day and...

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Death, Suicides, And The Pandemic Economy

Yves here.I recall seeing articles reporting that suicides have risen due to Covid-19, with experts in the field saying the individuals killing themselves seem more determined than is normally the case, since many attempts are cries for help or impulsive. However, this post indicates that the data isn’t consistent with these reports, which were both local and anecdotal. That suggests that the rise in suicides so far is concentrated in communities more likely to get media attention, such as...

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New York Rent Strikes During the 1918 “Spanish” Influenza

Yves here. The fight over rent, and more generally, who bears the cost of catastrophic economic damage, shows how little has changed from a century ago to now. But it is also important not to lose sight of the differences. One aspect of the Spanish flu versus our coronavirus is that we are taking a much bigger economic hit. Even though that era was well before the compilation of GDP data, most historians peg the global economy as growing even during the Spanish flu. One factor was that there...

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The Economics and Politics of Social Democracy: A Reconsideration

Yves here. This history of the decline of social democracy comes from a vantage that might strike readers as novel: that of economic policy and how that played out in politics. By Servaas Storm, Senior Lecturer of Economics, Delft University of Technology. Originally published at the Institute for New Economic Thinking website Social democracy, the political force that shaped post-1945 Western Europe more than any other political movement, is in terminal decline—or so it appears. In recent...

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Because Culture Matters, There Is No One-Size-Fits-All Exit Strategy from Covid-19 Lockdowns

Yves here. A few days ago, we ran a post on how different the Covid-19 infection rates were in two neighboring Queens communities, Flushing, which has a large Chinese population, and Corona, which is strongly Hispanic. One reader pointed out that the Latin culture likely played a role, with hugging, backslapping, and physical closeness in social interactions common. Looks like he was on to something…. By Jean-Philippe Platteau, Active Emeritus Professor of Economics, University of Namur and...

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A Way To Make COVID-19 College Furloughs More Fair

Yves here. In a bit of synchronicity, we wrote about the dire state of university and college finances, and today, The Conversation has a story on how the “progressive” pay cuts the University of California system implemented after the financial crisis as a badly-needed “shared pain” model. Better paid workers are taking bigger pay cuts than those at the bottom. However, I suspect that readers would contend that the very highly remunerated ones, particularly football coaches and top...

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Waiting for “Rooseveltian Relief”: An Oversimplified Framework for the Employment Situation

I’ve always loved the term “Employment Situation,” from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, because employment is indeed so often a “situation.” Like now, where the unemployment numbers are Great Depression-level (and probably undercounted, because of methodological issues at BLS and technical issues at the state level). Treasury Secretary Mnuchin says “the reported numbers are probably going to get worse before they get better.” It’s not clear that the lost jobs will come back. 42 million...

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Surgical Masks: From Protection to Fashion?

By Lambert Strether of Corrente This is going to be a pretty random post, and I’m not even going to add a potted history of masks (not even in Asia). I’m going to start out with my own simple experience of mask-wearing, and then give a random selection from the incredible ferment of mask-making by many small artisans and manufacturers all over the world. (Note that “small artisan” goes all the petites mains of the House of Chanel.) Massive uptake of mask-wearing would have significant health...

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In Quest of the May Day Strikes

By Lambert Strether of Corrente Sometimes when frustrated, I recall the famous New Yorker article by an author who thought he had a story about a bird in the woods, said to be extinct. But maybe not! So he found the local who thought they’d heard the bird’s distinctive, booming call, bought some yellow waders, hired guides and a boat, and set out through the swamps and the Spanish moss and the dripping and the stinging insects in search of the bird. Long-form story short, they never found the...

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Harmoniously Denied: The Wider Implications of China’s Censorship on COVID-19

Yves here. This discussion of Chinese censorship about Covid-19, including the author’s own experience, is useful not simply for the insights into the workings of the Chinese system, but also for the similarities and differences to censorship in the West. Specifically, the author observes that formerly top-down censorship has become part of the “collective mentality”. By Joy Yueyue Zhang, Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Kent. Her research investigates the transnational...

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