Tuesday , April 20 2021
Home / Tag Archives: Social policy

Tag Archives: Social policy

Daunte Wright’s Killing Makes the Case for Shrinking Police Budgets

Yves here. I don’t pretend to have any good answers for what to do about police brutality, particularly towards people of color. During the Presidential campaign, Biden backed even more police spending, no doubt to clam the nerves of the Dem’s professional-managerial class base. More unequal societies are lower trust societies, so the K-shaped recovery is only going to increase the perception of risk among the well off. Two things to keep in mind. First is that the most troubling form of...

Read More »

Lessons from the First New Deal for the Next One

Yves here. While this article has a lot to recommend it, I have to voice some reservations. The first is that it jumps on the “Biden as FDR” bandwagon, which Lambert debunked yesterday. The second is the New Deal brand expropriation by Green New Deal advocates. As we’ve stressed repeatedly, the Green New Deal proponents will not acknowledge, let alone promote, far and aways the most important and urgent measures we can take to combat climate change: radical conservation. They aren’t even...

Read More »

Good Friday and Easter Church Raid Attempts by Police Over Covid Intensify Conservative Christian Vaccine Hesitancy

Yves here. We didn’t expect to return to a heated topic so soon, that of conservative Christian resistance to Covid 19 vaccines, which we discussed late last week. As the post described, they have two grounds for concerns. One is the use of fetal stem cell lines. The connection to the vaccines may seem pretty strained to those not sensitive to this issue, but it isn’t fabricated.1 The second is that the proposed vaccine passports sound like the Mark of the Beast. Lambert found the relevant...

Read More »

Martin Luther King’s America Redux: “The Greatest Purveyor of Violence in the World”

Yves here. Comparatively few recall that Martin Luther King fell into disfavor in the US when he became an early critic of the War in Vietnam. King described how the cost of the conflict fell disproportionately on young black men and that military spending drained resources from social programs. But he also stated that as an advocate of non-violence, he had to stand for it in all settings, which included opposing US aggression abroad. We’re fans of Liz Theoharis, and we hope you appreciate...

Read More »

Christian Nationalism Is a Barrier to Mass Vaccination Against COVID-19

Yves here. I’m running this post with its original headline, although the article doesn’t make terribly clear what “Christian nationalism” is. The author defines is at extreme evangelism but I’m at a loss to understand what makes that “nationalism”. The reason I am running this article is that it discusses an specific issue that IM Doc mentioned back in early February. And even though we are discussing different subcultures in America, we might as well be talking about different countries....

Read More »

Our Collective Long Covid

We hate to play our regular role of being the (early) bearer of bad tidings. For some time, we’ve been pointing to information and developments that suggest that efforts to contain Covid are having only limited success. That means Covid will be with us a very long time. Yet there’s still a tremendous amount of wishful thinking and denial which has the potential to make this bad situation worse. Ambrit’s take yesterday: “The Pandemic is not even slowing down, yet, a false sense of triumphalism...

Read More »

Austerity Raises Covid Deaths

Yves here. Over the years, this site and members of the commentariat has regularly brought up the widespread decline in administrative competence, visibly in the public sector but often in the private sector as well. Although it’s a reasonable intuition that countries that had starved their public services, particularly health care, would have more difficulty in managing Covid, it’s still important to have a solid look at the data to see if that assumption holds up. By Servaas Storm, Senior...

Read More »

Incomplete and Indecisive USPS Board Flounders and Awaits Direction

Yves here. Sorry to be the bearer of less than cheery tidings on the USPS front. Despite Biden moving to fill empty USPS board seats and achieve more party-balanced oversight, true to Biden’s branding, nothing fundamental will change, at least anytime soon. Sadly, it does not look like pressure from “progressives” or even the general public is having much impact. Contrast the sober piece below with the #2 story at Common Dreams: Senator Demands Postal Board Fire DeJoy Over ‘Pathetic 10-Year...

Read More »

End Vaccine Apartheid Before Millions More Die

Yves here. Obviously Big Pharma killing people en masse in low income countries by not allowing them to acquire Covid vaccines is an atrocity, yet all too true to form. Not only are drugmakers refusing to issue waivers to allow low income countries to manufacture under a low-cost vaccine license or waiver, they are going to charge them more than EU member states to buy them! And the bean-counters may further hope that by having Covid not contained in large swathes of the population will lead...

Read More »

Cabin Fever: Americans (of Means) Keen to Travel. How Many Will Play it Safe?

Europe is in the midst of a Covid surge. The Qantas CEO is talking up vaccination passports, and the EU is planning on one for within the bloc, although the WHO is not on board. New variants are spreading abroad in the US. Yet with infection rates merely down to where they were five months ago, and only about 10% of the population fully vaccinated (and no solid data on whether/how much having been vaccinated reduces spread), American are sick of being cooped up. Many people want back to some...

Read More »