Thursday , February 27 2020
Home / Tag Archives: Ridiculously obvious scams

Tag Archives: Ridiculously obvious scams

New Mexico Attorney General Sues Google Over Kiddie Privacy

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. New Mexico attorney general (AG) Hector Balderas sued Google last week for violating children’s privacy, presenting claims under the federal Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) and New Mexico’s Unfair Practices Act. See the complaint here. “Google has infiltrated more than half the nation’s primary- and secondary-schools by offering...

Read More »

Legacy Admissions: Johns Hopkins Drops Preferences, Other Institutions Consider Changes

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Johns Hopkins University just announced that it’s abandoned the practice of legacy admissions – preferences for children and relatives of an alumnus or alumna. In fact, Johns Hopkins ended the practice in 2014 – and only got around to announcing the change in January. The percentage of legacy students in its 2019 freshman class has now fallen to 3.5%,...

Read More »

Taxcast: Financial Secrecy Index: Who Are the World’s Worst Offenders?

Yves here. Hope you enjoy this month’s Taxcast! If you’d like to listen to it offline, you can download it here. Originally published at Tax Justice Network In this special extended Taxcast, Naomi Fowler takes you on a whistle-stop guided tour on an express train around the world with some of the Tax Justice Network team, looking at the worst offenders selling secrecy services according to the latest Financial Secrecy Index results What can nations can do to protect themselves and their...

Read More »

Private Equity’s War to Preserve Surprise Billing

If you want proof that private equity is predatory, you need go not further than its concerted efforts to extend and intensify the devastating practice of surprise billing. Bad enough that patients develop afflictions or have accidents that land them in the hospital. Recovering physically is hard enough. But to then have the stress and financial damage of large and unexpected bills, which are exercises in rent extraction, is the sort of thing that creates Madame DeFarges. Private equity...

Read More »

Why No Retired Generals Oppose America’s Forever Wars

Yves here. Even though Sjursen describes the cultural factors and institutional mechanisms that allow the US armed services to perpetuate pro-war groupthink, I’m surprised to see almost no mention of economic incentives. Retired generals can look forward to consulting assignments and board appointments with military contractors. Some also wind up getting lucrative speaking gigs. Having a possible or actual dissident in their ranks could lead to uncomfortable conversations about “Why didn’t...

Read More »

CalPERS’ Election Rigging: Pushing for Most Costly, Insecure Online and Phone Voting Despite Abject Failure, Why? To Help SEIU Influence Election

CalPERS gave another display of its signature brazenness and dishonesty on Tuesday at its Finance and Administration Committee meeting. Then, the staff presented to the board their proposals for how to conduct the next set of board elections. Even though the security and accuracy of voting methods has become a regular news topic, thanks to worries about Rooskie hacking and fiascoes like Iowa caucus app meltdown demonstrating the risks of Internet tabulation, CalPERS’ staff served up...

Read More »

Another Demise of a Storied Business at the Hands of Private Equity: Fairway

I’m a bit late to discuss the bankruptcy, or more accurately, the second bankruptcy, of the well-loved New York City grocery chain, Fairway. As we’ll discuss, while some Fairway stores may continue under their current format, the suburban ones don’t appear to have a possible buyer in the wings and may be shuttered. And even for the New York City operations that are currently slated to remain under the Fairway banner, its workers, which many observers argue was part of the store’s appeal, are...

Read More »

What the Heck Happened to Surprise Billing Legislation? (Or, It’s Never Too Late for the Lobbyists to Win)

Yves here. Way too much happening, and the nuking of surprise billing bills haven’t gotten the attention they warrant. We did comment on how proposed California legislation was dispatched by what amounted to a handwave.…indicating that way too many people were already clued in to the notion that backing the bill was tantamount to crossing private equity, a career-limiting move for any pol. By APeticola. Originally published at Health Care Renewal With constituents pressing for something to...

Read More »

Ship the Airplane: The Cultural, Organizational and Technical Reasons Why Boeing Cannot Recover

Jerri-Lynn here. Grab a cup of coffee and make time to read this devastating analysis of what went wrong at Boeing.. By Gregory Tavis, a writer, a software executive, a pilot, and an aircraft owner who has logged more than 2,000 hours of flying time, ranging from gliders to a Boeing 757 (as a full-motion simulator). [NB:  This is a companion to How the Boeing 737 Max Disaster looks to a Software Developer which appeared in IEEE Spectrum in the spring of 2019] In 2019, two brand-new Boeing 737...

Read More »

Yet More Finance Profiteering: Green Bonds

On the one hand, a new finance fad of “green bonds” shows that investors recognize that climate change is a risk. On the other, it simply perpetuates the convenient but false notion that the private sector by the virtue of cute packaging is a leader as opposed to a laggard in addressing climate change. In fact, confirming doubts about the ability of Wall Street to have good intentions, these green bonds are at best a gimmick to enrich middlemen at the expense of communities and investors and...

Read More »