Thursday , November 14 2019
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Tag Archives: retirement

Corporate Profits Are Worse Than You Think

Corporate profits are worse than you think. In a recent post, I discussed the deviation of the stock market from corporate profitability. To wit: “If the economy is slowing down, revenue and corporate profit growth will decline also. However, it is this point which the ‘bulls’ should be paying attention to. Many are dismissing currently high valuations under the guise of ‘low interest rates,’ however, the one thing you should not dismiss, and cannot make an excuse for, is the massive...

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10 Financial Planning Rules You Shouldn’t Ignore.

Financial planning is misunderstood. Ask consumers or brokers what financial planning means to them and the conversation steers toward the portfolio or a pitch for investment and insurance products. “I asked for a financial plan –  he gave me a brochure about long-term care insurance.” – Anonymous. So, you’re considering holistic financial planning? I commend you.  Here Are The 10-Rules Rule #1 – Take a holistic approach to every financial decision. Money doesn’t exist in a vacuum; money is...

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Technically Speaking: Everyone Is Swimming In The “Deep End.”

With the market breaking out to all-time highs, the media has started to once again reach for their party hats as headlines suggest clear sailing for investors ahead. After all, why not?   The Federal Reserve cut rates for the 3rd time this year. The Fed is also back in the “QE” game of buying bonds. President Trump has “surrendered” to China in order to end the “trade war.”  Corporate stock buybacks are on track for the second largest year on record. Earnings, due to buybacks, are beating...

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15-Extreme Risks & How You Can Navigate Them

Willis Towers Watson’s Thinking Ahead Institute (TAI) recently revealed what it considers the 15-extreme risks facing investors for 2019, as well as for the years ahead. The risks run the gamut from climate change to nuclear contamination. TAI’s research suggests, broadly, there are three hedging strategies available to institutions: Hold cash. Over long historical periods cash has held its real value through both episodes of deflation and inflation but there is no guarantee that this will...

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Dow 650,000? We Are Already There!

Just recently, CNBC ran an article touting the call of “Billionaire Investor Ron Baron” of the Dow reaching 650,000 in just 50-years. Billionaire investor Ron Baron sees the Dow at 650,000 in 50 years https://t.co/oPElm0nrHT — CNBC (@CNBC) October 25, 2019 As noted in the article: “Speaking from his annual investment conference in New York, Baron predicted the Dow Jones Industrial Average, based on historical moves over decades, will reach 650,000 in 50 years, with an over $500 trillion...

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Medicare Advantage? A Couple of Things To Consider

It’s that time of year again. Medicare Open Enrollment season began October 15 and runs through December 7th. If you’re Medicare-eligible or in Original Medicare or Medicare Advantage, I’m confident you’re getting bombarded with advertisements and collateral materials. Remember, this is the annual opportunity to review your Medicare Advantage and Prescription Drug D plans to make certain costs and benefits still meet your personal needs. By now, recipients should have received Evidence of...

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Technically Speaking: 4-Risks To The Bullish View

When I was growing up, my father, probably much like yours, had pearls of wisdom that he would drop along the way. It wasn’t until much later in life that I learned that such knowledge did not come from books but through experience. One of my favorite pieces of “wisdom” was: “A sure-fire ‘no lose’ proposition is doing exactly the opposite of whatever ‘no lose’ proposition is being proposed.” Of course, back then, he was mostly giving me “life advice” about not following along with my...

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2020 Social Security Cost of Living Numbers Released

This is the time of year when leaves fall and the Social Security Administration announces the annual cost of living adjustment (COLA) for people receiving Social Security. For 2020 the increase will be 1.6 percent, or about $24 per month, raising the average monthly individual payout to $1503. It will boost the maximum retirement benefit by $150 to $3011 per month. The average and maximum Social Security benefits figures don’t include delayed retirement credits, which reward Social Security...

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Why The Measure Of “Savings” Is Entirely Wrong

In our recent series on capitalism (Read Here), we were discussing how the implementation of socialism, by its very nature, requires an ability to run unlimited deficits. In that discussion was the following quote: “Deficits are self-financing, deficits push rates down, deficits raise private savings.” – Stephanie Kelton On the surface, there does seem to be a correlation between surging deficits and increases in private savings, as long as you ignore the long-term trend, or the reality of...

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3 Tips To Avoid A “Save Taxes NOW!” Mentality

We scramble to do whatever we can to save on taxes. Unfortunately, there’s little firepower in the form of itemized deductions since the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) was initiated. The www.taxfoundation.org estimates that nearly 90% of taxpayers will continue to take the expanded standard deduction which has increased from $6,500 to $12,000 for single filers; $13,000 to $24,000 for those married filing jointly. If you recall, the income tax changes under TCJA expire at the end of 2025. CPAs,...

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