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Tag Archives: Privatization

A Bitter(Sweet) Pill: The Impacts of Private Provision of Medicaid

Yves here. The authors of this study get points for finding a natural experiment on privatizing Medicaid, namely Texas starting in 2007. Although the findings and detail are valuable, I have doubts about the way they framed one of their conclusions. One reason privatized Medicare delivered better results in Texas than the old government-run version is that Texas had a punitive limit on prescriptions of three meds a month. That limit was removed when Medicare was made private. Texas could just...

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Trump’s Border Wall is a Multi-Billion Dollar Corporate Handout

By Nick Buxton, a communications consultant, whose publications include “Civil society and debt cancellation” in Civil society and human rights (Routledge, 2004) and “Politics of debt” in Dignity and Defiance: Bolivia’s challenge to globalisation (University of California Press/Merlin Press UK, January 2009) and Todd Miller, the author of Border Patrol Nation: Dispatches From the Front Lines of Homeland Security, who has written on border and immigration issues for the New York Times, Al...

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Another School Leadership Disaster: Private Companies Work an Insider Game to Reap Lucrative Contracts

Lambert here: More corruption in the professional class. By Jeff Bryant, a writing fellow and chief correspondent for Our Schools, a project of the Independent Media Institute. He is a communications consultant, freelance writer, advocacy journalist, and director of the Education Opportunity Network, a strategy and messaging center for progressive education policy. His award-winning commentary and reporting routinely appear in prominent online news outlets, and he speaks frequently at...

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Here Are Photos of Some of the Dilapidated Equipment San Francisco Wants to Buy from Bankrupt PG&E for $2.5 Billion

Yves here. These PG&E pix are scary! This is in San Francisco, where access to equipment ought to be easy. But Wolf seems to be skipping over a point. By buying this shoddy equipment, San Francisco is also presumably paying a premium to step in as the electrical provider. What is that worth? It may not justify this much of a premium over the asset value, but  having an existing grid does have value, particularly given cost of trying to build de novo. By Wolf Richter, publisher of Wolf...

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A European Perspective on Boeing’s 737 MAX Debacle: An “Existential Crisis” for a National Champion

By Lambert Strether of Corrente Der Spiegel has published a well-reported[1], long (~10,000 words), and devastating article on the Boeing 737 MAX crashes of Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302: “Boeing’s Crashes Expose Systemic Failings.” (The original German version was published on August 3rd, 2019; we in the Anglosphere were only able to read it on August 23.) The article is very solid (reader Harold comments: “Teutonic thoroughness”). For example, here is a detail that...

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Even Larry Summers Denounces World Bank’s “PEF” Ebola Bonds That Enriched Investors at Expense of the Sick in the Congo

Even Larry Summers, the former World Bank chief economist who recommended sending garbage to poor countries, thought an Ebola financing scheme cooked up by his former employer went too far. As recounted by another former World Bank economist, Olga Jonas, in of all places Nature, the World Bank was enamored of the idea of having the private sector somehow participate in getting money to countries stricken by Ebola if and when they needed it in the wake of the 2014-2016 outbreak that killed...

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Bretton Woods Institutions: Enforcers, Not Saviours?

By Anis Chowdhury, Adjunct Professor at Western Sydney University & University of New South Wales (Australia), who has held senior United Nations positions in New York and Bangkok, and Jomo Kwame Sundaram, a former economics professor, who was Assistant Director-General for Economic and Social Development, Food and Agriculture Organization, and who received the Wassily Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought in 2007. Originally published by Inter Press Service...

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How Private Prisons Affect Sentencing

By Christian Dippel, Assistant Professor of Economics, UCLA Anderson School of Management and Michael Poyker, Postdoctoral Researcher, Columbia University Graduate School of Business. Originally published at VoxEU The first private prison in the US opened in 1984. Over the next three decades, the imprisoned population increased by 194% while the country’s overall population increased by only 36%. This column examines the relationship between these two events, asking whether the growth of the...

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The Military-Industrial Jobs Scam

Yves here. This is a very important post, documenting how despite defense contractor claims to the contrary, increased military spending has been accompanied by job losses in the US. This should come as no surprise. Military contracting is an exercise in pork, and regularly flagrantly disregards national security. A classic example: US uniforms and boots are made in China. Another example of the benefits of military pork going outside the US was the use of contractors during the war in Iraq....

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Trump Promised Massive Infrastructure Projects—Instead We’ve Gotten Nothing

Yves here. In a bit of synchronicity, when a reader was graciously driving me to the Department of Motor Vehicles (a schlepp in the wilds of Shelby County), she mentioned she’d heard local media reports that trucks had had their weight limits lowered due to concern that some overpasses might not be able to handle the loads. Of course, a big reason infrastructure spending has plunged in the US is that it’s become an excuse for “public-private partnerships,” aka looting, when those deals take...

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