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Tag Archives: politics

The Agribusiness Alliance for a Green Revolution Failed Africa

Yves here. Agriculture/food sustainability expert Tim Wise speaks to Lynn Fries on how the promise that “modern,” as in “green revolution” or Big Ag approaches would revolutionize food production in poor nations and reduce hunger. Revolutionize they sure did, but not in the way they promised, in terms of results. As Wise explains, this push to displace small farmers and traditional practices hasn’t simply enriched foreign business interests. It has increased hunger. By Lynn Fries. Originally...

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Spike in Energy Prices Suggests That Sharp Changes Are Ahead

Yves here. Leroy R recommended the last Gail Tverberg piece, where she broadens out from her usual focus on energy to the issues of complexity and collapse. I decided to repost it because it’s meaty and thus likely to provoke a good discussion. That said, while I agree completely with her overview statement, that the trend towards complexity has gone too far, I have to beg to differ with her in making energy a central driver. What has made the increase in “complexity” destabilizing is that it...

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Brexit: David Frost’s Bluster Can’t Wish Away the Northern Ireland Protocol

Yves here. I am behind in providing an update on the state of Brexit, now that the UK has officially gotten stroppy over the Northern Ireland protocol and the EU has formulated some fixed. But this openDemocracy piece provides a good overview of the issues in play, especially the UK’s belief that it holds a trump card in its threat to trigger an Article 16 dispute. Regular readers will note that the UK, true to form, is overplaying its hand. By George Peretz, a queen’s counsel in England and...

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It’s OK To Be Angry. How Else Will We Change the World?

Yves here. I am a big believer in anger. It’s been disconcerting, if revealing, to see the degree to which even fairly mild forms of conflict are increasingly treated as deviant behavior. One staple is the small city public meeting where a citizen gets up to complain about something in public comments. Even if his tone remains measured, straight talk is often depicted by the chair as angry or disrespectful….as if any criticism is out of line and public officials were superior to their...

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Officials Double Down on “Let ‘Er Rip” Strategy, Placing Undue Faith in Vaccines as Regions With High Vaccinations Suffer Infection Spikes

Again and again, all over the world, we’ve seen public health officials all too willing to relax Covid restrictions too early, resulting in an eventual spike in infections and hospitalizations. As we’ll explain, regulators are repeating the same experiment and expecting different outcomes, The classic example was the May CDC “Mission Accomplished” policy change of telling the fully vaccinated they could go about unmasked, even as Delta had become the dominant strain, had viral loads 1000x...

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Jim Chanos: China’s “Leveraged Prosperity” Model is Doomed. And That’s Not the Worst

Yves here. We’ve pointed out from time to time with respect to China that no large economy has ever made the transition from being investment-led to consumption-led without suffering a financial crisis. Here, short-seller Jim Chanos, who has been too early with respect to China longer than Nouriel Roubini was with respect to the global financial crisis, argues that the Chinese real estate bubble has gotten so out of hand despite repeated efforts by the government to let air out of it that bad...

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New Report Highlights Corporate Funding of Police Foundations, Which Encourage Police Militarization and Thwart Reform

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. One thing I learned from studying with Tom Ferguson: follow the money. That’s the Golden Rule for understanding American politics and other money-driven political systems. Alas, political scientists and other students of politics often don’t do this, for a variety of reasons, not least that they don’t want to admit – let alone document – how our...

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The John Deere Strike: Organized Labor’s Turning Point?

There’s a lot of excitement, at least among those of the pro-worker persuasion, about employees rejecting poorly paid jobs and oppressive bosses via not taking up open positions or demanding change via strikes. A partial list: Volvo. Kellogg’s. Frito-Lay. Nabisco. Alabama coal miners. Health care staffers in New York and Massachusetts, along with bus drivers and telecom workers. Even though they are highly visible signs that the serfs are rebelling, these labor actions are still a strong of...

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Bad Biden Foreign Policy

Yves here. While Rosser is correct to depict Biden foreign policy as an ongoing train wreck (Rahm to Japan? Hard to imagine anyone temperamentally less well suited to dealing with that culture), he oddly neglected to highlight the latest splat: AUKUS. This deal was not just a diss of India but also a threat. Indian diplomats have said not in diplospeak but plain noun-verb sentences that this move made clear the US wasn’t much of a friend and maybe getting cozier with China would be a smart...

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Weekly Market Pulse: Perception vs Reality

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times… Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities   Some see the cup as half empty. Some see the cup as half full. I see the cup as too large. George Carlin   The quote from Dickens above is one that just about everyone knows even if they don’t know where it comes from or haven’t read the book. But, as the ellipsis at the end indicates, there is quite a bit more to the line than the part everyone remembers. It was the best...

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