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Tag Archives: politics

CalPERS’ Long-Term Care Policy Train Wreck – Is Bankruptcy the End Game?

It doesn’t look like there will be a happy ending for the over 100,000 CalPERS long-term care policy holders who are represented in the class action lawsuit, Wedding v. CalPERS. That doesn’t mean there’s a good outcome for CalPERS either. However, things should work out for the plaintiffs’ attorneys. The bone of contention is that CalPERS approved an eye-popping 85% increase in premiums in 2013, hitting only the policies with the most generous payment features. The plaintiffs contend that...

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The Numbers Are In, and Trump’s Tax Cuts Are a Bust

By Marshall Auerback, a market analyst and commentator. Produced by Economy for All, a project of the Independent Media Institute The most commonly heard refrain when Donald Trump and the GOP were seeking to pass some version of corporate tax reform went something like this: There are literally trillions of dollars trapped in offshore dollar deposits which, because of America’s uncompetitive tax rates, cannot be brought back home. Cut the corporate tax rate and get those dollars repatriated,...

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The ‘New Right’ Is Not a Reaction to Neoliberalism, but Its Offspring

By Lars Cornelissen, who holds a PhD in the Humanities and works as a researcher and editor for the Independent Social Research Foundation. Originally published at openDemocracy The ongoing and increasingly intense conservative backlash currently taking place across Europe is often understood as a populist reaction to neoliberal policy. The neoliberal assault on the welfare state, as for instance Chantal Mouffe has argued, has eroded post-war social security even as it destroyed people’s...

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Our Summer Of Discontent

Turning and turning in the widening gyre The falcon cannot hear the falconer; Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere    The ceremony of innocence is drowned; The best lack all conviction, while the worst    Are full of passionate intensity. –  W.B. Yeats As we expected, the rivets are beginning pop in Washington and in the American body politic, We are expecting a Summer of Discontent. That...

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Waste Watch: Why Do We Discard So Many Edible Fish We Pull From the Sea?

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Why, in an age of declining fish stocks and persistent global hunger, do we discard so many edible fish we pull from the sea? The short answer, as the Guardian reported yesterday in Ban on discarding edible fish caught at sea has failed – Lords report: The wasteful practice of discarding edible fish at sea has been one of the key charges levelled...

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The Big Blue Gap in the Green New Deal

By Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, a marine biologist, founder and CEO of the consulting firm Ocean Collectiv, and founder of Urban Ocean Lab, a think tank for coastal cities, Dr. Chad Nelsen, CEO of Surfrider Foundation, the largest grassroots organization dedicated to coastal and ocean protection, and Bren Smith, founder of GreenWave and author of Eat Like a Fish: My Adventures as a Fisherman Turned Restorative Ocean Farmer (Knopf). Originally published at Grist In February, Representative...

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How NGOs in Rich Countries Control their Counterparts in Poor Countries..and Why they Refuse to Resolve it

By Paul Okumu, head of secretariat for the Africa Platform on Governance, Responsible Business and the Social Contract. He is also head of strategy at the Internet of Things Solutions Africa.. Originally published at Inter Press Service Many NGOs around the world are fighting inequality between the rich and the poor, between the policies that make rich countries richer, and poor countries poorer. So while Civil Society Organizations claim to be equal and are are fighting together to secure...

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Will Democratic Party Superdelegates Prevent a Progressive Nominee in 2020?

Jerri-Lynn here. As the Democratic Party race for the nomination heats up, the threat of superdelegates intervening in the 2020 party convention looms. A  reform agreed last year means their participation is more limited than in the past: superdelegates can no longer vote during the first ballot, but only during the second and subsequent ones, should no candidate secure a majority. Norman Solomon discusses the situation in this Real News Network interview. GREG WILPERT It’s...

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Is There a Global Future for Unions?

Yves here. This personal account of the rise and fall (and hopeful rebirth) of unions correctly gives prominent play to the right-wing anti-labor effort whose strategy was set forth in the 1971 Powell Memo. By Leo W. Gerard, the international president of the United Steelworkers Union (USW). Produced by the Independent Media Institute In March 2010, a rally by thousands of striking USW workers at the Vale mine and smelter in Sudbury, Canada, was joined by allies from Brazil, Australia and...

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Michael Hudson: De-Dollarizing the American Financial Empire

Yves here. Another meaty Michael Hudson interview on Guns and Butter. However, I have to vehemently disagree with the claim made by Bonnie Faulkner at the top of the discussion. No one holds guns to other countries’ heads to make them hold dollars. The reason the dollar is the reserve currency is the US is willing to export jobs via running persistent trade deficits.  The US moved away from  having rising worker wages as the key metric of sound economic policy in the 1970s, when labor was...

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