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Tag Archives: markets

Bear Markets: Understand Them, Don’t Fear Them 06-14-19

Is The Sellable Rally Done? Some Comments On The Fed Cutting Rates Sector & Market Analysis 401k Plan Manager Follow Us On: Twitter, Facebook, Linked-In, Sound Cloud,Seeking Alpha Wednesday, June 26th from 12:30-1:30 pm. Review & Update This week I want to step back and talk about some misconceptions with concerning markets, cycles, and investing. However, before we get to that, let me give you a quick review and update on where we are following the “sellable rally,” we have...

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Why Ray Dalio Is Wrong On Capitalism

Ray Dalio is the thoughtful, somewhat controversial founder of the world’s largest hedge fund, Bridgewater Associates, which he started in 1975. While much of his writing is private, I (and many others) peruse every word we can of his and the Bridgewater team’s thinking. I find it to be some of the most interesting market commentary I read. Lately, Ray has been far more open with his thinking, posting books and essays. He posted on LinkedIn rather controversial stories: Why and How Capitalism...

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US IP: May Was A Good Month And It Was Still ‘Manufacturing Recession’

Whether or not a full-scale recession shows up in the US is an open question. There’s less of one in US industry. The “manufacturing recession” we last saw of Euro$ #3 is becoming clearer as a repeat property in Euro$ #4. According to the Federal Reserve, May was a relatively good month for industry – total output didn’t decline from April. No matter in the big picture. The trajectory is becoming very well established. As is consistent with economic and market data from all over the world,...

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China’s Wolf, Not Dragon

Much of the original thesis on economic decoupling surrounded myths of what were believed invulnerable economies. Emerging markets might see some slowing during 2008, but they weren’t supposed to drop off. China was right at the top of everyone’s list, the unstoppable force then transforming the world’s political as well as economic order. In the early months of the Global Financial Crisis (how was it global, again?), that was how it went. The US and much of Europe were in deep trouble. The...

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Retail Sales (US): Green Shoots Under the 3% Line?

Retail Sales rose just 3.46% year-over-year (unadjusted) in May 2019. The estimate for April was revised substantially higher, now suggesting growth of 5.6%. Altogether, however, consumer spending continues to be unusually weak. How unusual? The 6-month average, a better gauge of growth conditions given the noisy nature of the series, is now below 3% for the first time since late 2016. The 3% mark is historically more like recession than anything else. In more recent times, with the lack of...

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A Domestic Conversation

Once you realize negative yielding sovereign bonds aren’t investments, they are balance sheet tools for global banks, things start to fall into place. I had the honor to chat with the fellas at Grant’s Interest Rate Observer. In a world where stocks are the media kings it’s good every once in a while to talk to people who know better. Jeff Snider (@JeffSnider_AIP), head of global research of Alhambra Investments, calls in to discuss the workings of the modern financial...

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Curve Sanity (Not What Most People Want To Hear or See)

Rate cuts will be insurance against whatever “trade wars” will throw at the global economy. That’s the current line from monetary officials in the US, anyway. The real question to ask is, how would they know? Starting with trade wars. Is that really what’s behind all this? The evolution of the curves told you everything you need to know, and tell you what to prepare for. It’s not just inversion that is noteworthy. They said all along there was no boom, even during the most maniacal parts of...

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One Trick Pony: The Fed Is Pushing On A String

Last week, I discussed the Fed’s recent comments suggesting they might be closer to cutting rates and restarting “QE” than not. “In short, the proximity of interest rates to the ELB (Effective Lower Bound) has become the preeminent monetary policy challenge of our time, tainting all manner of issues with ELB risk and imbuing many old challenges with greater significance.   “Perhaps it is time to retire the term ‘unconventional’ when referring to tools that were used in the crisis. We...

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Curve-sanity

There are those which are so very clear in their disingenuousness – to the point of overdoing it and becoming obviously absurd. In the increasingly desperate rush to downplay the headlong race to rate cuts, this one’s up there: Eurodollar futures traders, having decided that the Federal Reserve is likely to cut the fed funds target range at least twice over the next six months, are looking beyond the expected easing cycle in search of their next edge — the point at which rates will...

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Dimmed Hopes In China Cars, Too

As noted earlier this week, the world’s two big hopes for the global economy in the second half are pinned on the US labor market continuing to exert its purported strength and Chinese authorities stimulating out of every possible (monetary) opening. Incoming data, however, continues to point to the fallacies embedded within each. The US labor market is a foundation of non-inflationary sand, and China’s “stimulus” is proving again to be little more than ad hoc deflection of an enormous...

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