Tuesday , August 20 2019
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Tag Archives: Legal

Dow Jones “Emasculated” in CalPERS Copyright Abuse Per Supreme Court Amicus Brief Citing Work of This Humble Blog

Yesterday, in Wall Street Journal Publisher Tells Supreme Court of Being Victimized by California, the Hollywood Reporter described in detail, based on an amicus brief filed with the US Supreme Court, how Dow Jones had tried to obtain damages for systematic copyright abuses we identified, and got way less than they thought they were entitled to due to California claiming that CalPERS had sovereign immunity.1 On Tuesday, Rupert Murdoch’s Dow Jones & Company shared a tale of woe with the...

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Brexit Breakup

The Institute for Government has confirmed our reading, that if this Government wants a no-deal Brexit, it will be well nigh impossible to prevent it. Astonishingly, Labour and Remainer Tories let their best option, that of a general election before October 31, slip from their grasp by failing to keep Parliament in session and stuck to their traditional summer recess. After Johnson won the premiership, his intentions for Brexit should have been seen as clear as soon as he announced his...

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CalPERS Staff Caught Out in Yet Another Power Grab, Tries Gagging the Board With Staff’s “Board Code of Conduct”

CalPERS attempted the governance equivalent of a Saturday Night massacre by hiding a proposal to gag board members and deny them their First Amendment rights of free speech. To this date, CalPERS continues to hide its planned power grab by failing to upload the relevant document to the Internet. Fortunately, Randy Diamond publicized one of the worst aspects of this scheme in an article in CIO Magazine, CalPERS Board Considers Gag Policy. In a display of its sense of entitlement, CalPERS...

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How Private Prisons Affect Sentencing

By Christian Dippel, Assistant Professor of Economics, UCLA Anderson School of Management and Michael Poyker, Postdoctoral Researcher, Columbia University Graduate School of Business. Originally published at VoxEU The first private prison in the US opened in 1984. Over the next three decades, the imprisoned population increased by 194% while the country’s overall population increased by only 36%. This column examines the relationship between these two events, asking whether the growth of the...

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Money Is Still King of the Hill And We Are All the Poorer for It: A Glance Back, and Forward

By Skip Kaltenheuser. An expanded version of an article originally published at DownWithTyranny! In Washington, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Except when they get worse. The recent Democratic Party Presidential Debates had me thinking on the enclosed essay on campaign finance, fished out of the wayback machine, that appeared in Barron’s. Way back, over two decades. At the time, I foolishly thought disgust with begging, with dialing for dollars would propel politicians...

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The Trump White House Is Upending Decades of Policy-Making Procedures

By Stuart Shapiro, Professor of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University. Originally published at The Conversation Whether it’s overhauling asylum procedures, adding a question about citizenship to the 2020 Census, or rolling back fuel standards, a pattern has emerged when the Trump administration changes policies and creates new ones. An announcement is made, media attention follows, the policy is formally proposed and finalized – generating more news coverage along the way. In many...

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Private Equity: The Perps Behind Destructive Hospital Surprise Billing

I have to confess to having missed how private equity is a central bad actor in the “surprise billing” scam that is being targeted by Federal and state legislation. This abuse takes place when hospital patients, even when using a hospital that is in their insurer’s network, are hit with charges for “out of network” services that are billed at inflated rack rates. Even patients who have done everything they can to avoid being snared, like insisting their hospital use only in-network doctors...

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Financial Times Goes Wobbly on Brexit No Deal Impact

The Financial Times has done a lot of important reporting on Brexit, such as being early to warn of the utter lack of customs IT systems preparedness (Customs was almost certain to be getting an inadequate upgrade planned before Brexit in place late) and on the number of agreements the UK would need to renegotiate. But it would also run the occasional too-obviously-planted story, such as ones that took the City’s demands way too seriously. Today the Financial Times published a supposedly...

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Carmakers and California Agree on Emissions Rules

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Four major carmakers – BMW, Ford, Honda, and Volkswagen – agreed last week to comply “voluntarily” with tougher California state emissions rules. These carmakers account for 30% of the global car market, according to The Verge, Major automakers buck Trump’s emissions rollback by signing deal with California. As I’ve written previously, the Trump...

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Roundup Roundup: Judge Slashes Punitive Damages Award in Glyphosate Lawsuit

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Winifred Smith on Thursday slashed a punitive damages award from $2.055 billion to $87 million in a lawsuit that concluded Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide caused cancer. This is the second time this month and the third time overall that a judge has reduced a jury’s punitive damages award in a glyphosate lawsuit. The...

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