Wednesday , July 15 2020
Home / Tag Archives: infrastructure

Tag Archives: infrastructure

Insight from Brussels: EU makes multi-billion euro bet on energy transition tech

Clean hydrogen, renewables, batteries, and carbon capture and storage are among the energy transition technologies set to benefit from billions of euros of public funding as the EU seeks to become climate neutral by 2050. Much of this is to come from the European Commission’s proposed Eur750 billion ($852 billion) “green” recovery plan, which needs unanimous approval from the EU’s 27 national governments to go ahead. The proposal includes EU budget guarantees of Eur20 billion for sustainable...

Read More »

The Pandemic Shows the Importance of Funding Early Childcare and Education Infrastructure (Updated)

Yves here. I don’t see how non-affluent families with two working parents and school aged kids coped with school closures. Some local groups stepped up and provided some childcare, but I have to think it was on a first come, first served basis, and I am not sure it continued once non-essential business closure order went into effect. This article makes a strong-form argument that investment in early and childcare need to be important parts of Covid-19 spending, not just to preserve jobs but...

Read More »

Why New Infrastructure Is a National Imperative

Yves here. Notice that what Tom Conway calls “infrastructure” is  “deferred maintenance,” hence the urgency. By Tom Conway, the international president of the United Steelworkers Union (USW). Produced by the Independent Media Institute Rich Carmona spent decades upgrading his 1970s ranch home in Midland, Michigan. He lovingly installed new flooring and doors and remodeled the bathrooms. After finishing the kitchen 18 months ago, he finally had the house the way he liked it. Then the...

Read More »

Contact Tracing Via Old Shoe-Leather Epidemiology While Spurning the Techno-Fix Fairy: How Hong Kong Quells COVID-19 Without Killing Civil Liberties

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Many countries are trying to quell their COVID-19 outbreaks by submitting to the tender ministrations of the technofix fairy, willingly sacrificing civil liberties to untested tracking apps. Now, I’m not going to deny that technology – including some form of contact tracing via mobile ‘phones – is part of future COVID-19 management. But the necessity...

Read More »

After Petrobras, part III: Brazil’s upstream is a gas supply source ready to be unleashed

In the third of a series, S&P Global Platts editors weigh in on Brazil’s liberalizing gas industry, with a look at developments, obstacles and possibilities in Brazil’s upstream sector. Brazil’s natural gas production has been on an upward swing in recent years on the back of increasing output of pre-salt oil, a layer of hydrocarbons resting below a layer of salt in offshore Brazil, up nearly 10% from 2018. Despite this growth, the upstream sector, one of the keys to the success of the...

Read More »

The CARES Act: Stimulus and Unemployment Checks

By Lambert Strether of Corrente. I am sure the hilariously named CARES (“Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security”) Act is just as horried as the 2008 bailouts, if not moreso — if only because the people in charge are even more greedy and venal than 2008’s crew[1] — but in this post, I’ll focus exclusively concrete material benefits for the working class — sadly, not universal — as opposed to whatever meagre benefits will “trickle down” from however our betters reconfigure “the...

Read More »

Decarbonize or die: is Europe turning its back on gas?

Natural gas – once praised as the key to an achievable energy transition in Europe – is increasingly falling out of favor. EU policymakers have spent years extolling the virtues of gas, calling it the cleanest of the fossil fuels and a bridge to a lower-carbon future. But the world – and Europe in particular – is shifting its stance toward gas quickly, meaning it is at risk of being left behind in the race to net zero emissions. Gas projects are increasingly vulnerable, as financiers and...

Read More »

After Petrobras: Brazil’s liberalizing gas market in limbo

In the first of a new series, S&P Global Platts editors weigh in on Brazil’s liberalizing gas market, taking in opportunities and risks for third-party pipeline imports from Bolivia, private LNG imports from the global market, and the growth of domestic competition in both the offshore and onshore markets. Last summer, Brazil began opening its natural gas trade to competition through historic market reforms. But recent challenges are raising doubts about the pace and certainty of...

Read More »

Map: Libya’s oil and gas infrastructure

Libya’s oil output fell from more than 1.1 million b/d at the end of 2019, to 262,000 b/d in late January, after the self-styled Libyan National Army suspended oil exports from key terminals and shut in the country’s main oil fields. The LNA, led by General Khalifa Haftar, has been trying to take over Tripoli from the UN-backed Libyan Government of National Accord since April. The blockade, which has at least temporarily removed around 1 million b/d of high quality crude from the global...

Read More »

Puerto Rico: Earthquake Aftershocks and Aftermath

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Recent years have not been kind to the island of Puerto Rico, nor to her people. First, Puerto Rico’s public finances were ravaged by vulture funds, leading to the imposition of extreme austerity policies, followed  by weak and inadequate  attempts by Congress to address the island’s woes  and place its finances on a viable long-term footing (see...

Read More »