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Tag Archives: infrastructure

Mangroves, Climate Change, and Mobilization

By Lambert Strether of Corrente. Readers will have noticed the headline is similar to this headline: “Coral Reefs, Climate Change, and Mobilization.” Same thing, different day, as I discovered after seeing a successful project on mangrove restoration go by on the Twitter, and then looking into mangroves. As before, I’m going to begin with the beauty of mangroves. A mangrove forest from close up[1], in Florida: From farther away, also in Florida, a mangrove copse: And an aerial view of an...

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Take the (Night) Train Redux

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Earlier this year, I posted about the growing movement by European environmentalists to eschew airplanes and take the train (see Take the (Night) Train). When I found myself in High Point, North Carolina recently and needed to get back to New York City, I decided to check out Amtrak’s services. I found two trains ply that route daily: one direct and...

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LNG must become more price-transparent and sustainable to thrive in next decade

The trend towards LNG commoditization has gathered pace, fueled by significant additions of elastic supply and demand and growing liquidity in both physical and financial LNG markets. This presents immense opportunities to LNG stakeholders. But the prospect of supply shortfalls and gluts through the next decade to 2030 is a warning sign that the industry is still exposed to abrupt investment cyclicality, a phenomenon known to cause disruptive supply shocks, price volatility and demand...

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A European Perspective on Boeing’s 737 MAX Debacle: An “Existential Crisis” for a National Champion

By Lambert Strether of Corrente Der Spiegel has published a well-reported[1], long (~10,000 words), and devastating article on the Boeing 737 MAX crashes of Lion Air Flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302: “Boeing’s Crashes Expose Systemic Failings.” (The original German version was published on August 3rd, 2019; we in the Anglosphere were only able to read it on August 23.) The article is very solid (reader Harold comments: “Teutonic thoroughness”). For example, here is a detail that...

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Libra: The Known Unknowns and Unknown Unknowns

By Barry Eichengreen, Professor of Economics and Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley; and formerly Senior Policy Advisor at the International Monetary Fund; CEPR Research Fellow. Originally published at VoxEU. The repercussions and regulatory impact of Facebook’s proposed Libra currency are still unclear. This column, part of the VoxEU debate on the future of digital money, assesses the information as yet made available about Libra, including the implications for its...

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Insight conversation: Jane Ren, CEO, Atomiton

Jane Ren, CEO of disruptive technology company Atomiton, talks to Paul Hickin about opportunities in the energy sector and the challenges faced by big oil. The mainstreaming of artificial intelligence and machine learning will have a profound impact on the industrial sphere, not least in energy industries. Whether companies are active in the upstream, midstream or downstream segment, they face enormous pressures to control cost while living up to societal demands for environmental...

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Who Will Pay for the Huge Costs of Holding Back Rising Seas?

By Jim Morrison. Originally published by Yale Environment 360 and cross posted from Grist’s Climate Desk collaboration For cities in the United States, the price of infrastructure projects to combat rising seas and intensifying storms is coming into focus — and so is the sticker shock. In Boston, where many neighborhoods have been built and recently expanded in low-lying areas, an estimated $2.4 billion will be needed over the next several decades to protect the city from flooding, one study...

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Existing North American oil pipelines boost capacity as new projects drag on

Canada’s three major options for new oil pipeline capacity continue to face delays and court challenges, but existing North American pipelines are finding ways to move more barrels to refiners and export docks on the US Gulf Coast. Midstream companies’ second-quarter earnings cycle revealed a wave of compressor-based pipeline expansions across the US Rockies and Midwest to increase throughputs at low costs and without major regulatory and construction risks. TC Energy and Enbridge are also...

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Why We Need Publicly Owned Energy for a Green New Deal

Yves here. Even though this piece is written for a UK audience, the principles have broad application. Seattle is one of the few US cities that operates its electrical utility. Can natives tell me how well that’s working, and what if any shortcomings need to be addressed, particularly from a clean energy perspective? By Cat Hobbs, director of We Own It. Originally published at openDemocracy Whether it’s 11 years or 18 months, we haven’t got long to make the big, bold changes needed to prevent...

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Reclaiming the Commons Through State Ownership? Maybe Not

By Milan Babic, a PhD candidate at the Corpnet research group at the University of Amsterdam. He works on the implications of the rise of transnational state capital and global corporate power. You can find him on Twitter (@mbabic_1) or on milanbabic.com. Originally published at openDemocracy as part of its Decolonising the economy’series In a 2001 essay, Naomi Klein passionately called for “reclaiming the commons” in a world increasingly dominated by corporate power and shaped by a...

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