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Tag Archives: Health care

How Taiwan Beat COVID-19 – New Study Reveals Clues to its Success

By Patricia Fitzpatrick, Full Professor of Epidemiology & Biomedical Statistics, University College Dublin, Originally published at The Conversation. Taiwan has been widely applauded for its management of the pandemic, with one of the lowest per capita COVID-19 rates in the world and life on the island largely returning to normal. Just 11 people have died from COVID-19 in Taiwan since the pandemic began, an impressive feat for a country that never went into lockdown. At the start of the...

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Prolonged Brain Dysfunction in COVID-19 Survivors: A Pandemic in its Own Right?

Yves here. We are running this post because Covid brain impairment is an important topic in its own right, and also to counter the dangerous patter we keep encountering in comments about how Covid is overblown because not all that many people die of it. This is “Oh, it’s no worse than the seasonal flu” 2.0, when no seasonal flu has reduced life expectancy or pushed hospitals across the US to their breaking point. But the issue that this article highlights is that the danger of Covid goes far...

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What Covid Means for the Athlete’s Heart

Yves here. We’re running this post as an apparently badly needed reminder that the consequences of getting Covid extend beyond the risk of death, hospitalization, and missing time from work. Many who contract Covid suffer from damage that may be lasting, from serious lung abnormalities to kidney impairments and brain inflammation. This post focuses on the heart. By Markian Hawryluk. Originally published at Kaiser Health News For sports fans across the country, the resumption of the regular...

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Why India is Banking on Health Diplomacy to Grow African Footprint

By Dan Banik, Professor of political science, Director of the Oslo SDG Initiative, Host of “In Pursuit of Development” podcast, University of Oslo and Renu Modi, Professor in African Studies, University of Mumbai. Originally published at The Conversation. India has stepped up its global ambitions and foreign policy re-engagement with African countries in recent years. Its bilateral trade increased from $7.2 billion in 2001 to $63 billion in 2017/18. India is now the third largest export...

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Good Friday and Easter Church Raid Attempts by Police Over Covid Intensify Conservative Christian Vaccine Hesitancy

Yves here. We didn’t expect to return to a heated topic so soon, that of conservative Christian resistance to Covid 19 vaccines, which we discussed late last week. As the post described, they have two grounds for concerns. One is the use of fetal stem cell lines. The connection to the vaccines may seem pretty strained to those not sensitive to this issue, but it isn’t fabricated.1 The second is that the proposed vaccine passports sound like the Mark of the Beast. Lambert found the relevant...

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Christian Nationalism Is a Barrier to Mass Vaccination Against COVID-19

Yves here. I’m running this post with its original headline, although the article doesn’t make terribly clear what “Christian nationalism” is. The author defines is at extreme evangelism but I’m at a loss to understand what makes that “nationalism”. The reason I am running this article is that it discusses an specific issue that IM Doc mentioned back in early February. And even though we are discussing different subcultures in America, we might as well be talking about different countries....

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Getting a Prescription to Die Remains Tricky Even as Aid-in-Dying Bills Gain Momentum

Yves here. “Right to die” is a product of Christian prohibitions against suicide. After all, none of us gets out of here alive. However, the issue of pain or severe debility among the old and not necessarily so old is seldom discussed in polite company. My father shot himself when he could no longer endure the horrific symptoms of an autoimmune disease that was always fatal. One of my parents’ friends had successfully fought off breast cancer a couple of times. When it recurred and she was...

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A Covid Tragedy: “Wholesale Discrediting of Our Health Science Institutions”

Yves here. Quite a few readers responded strongly to a comment that came late in Nick Corbishley’s post yesterday on Ivermectin, from a reader in despair about what Covid had reveled about the state of health science in America, not just too many signs of weak organizational competence (like the CDC’s test kit fiasco) but also the quiet contempt which too many institutional leaders apparently have for the public at large. Why, for instance, did anyone think it made any sense to tell the Noble...

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Our Collective Long Covid

We hate to play our regular role of being the (early) bearer of bad tidings. For some time, we’ve been pointing to information and developments that suggest that efforts to contain Covid are having only limited success. That means Covid will be with us a very long time. Yet there’s still a tremendous amount of wishful thinking and denial which has the potential to make this bad situation worse. Ambrit’s take yesterday: “The Pandemic is not even slowing down, yet, a false sense of triumphalism...

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Why Won’t Doctors Take Cash?

From time to time, I’ve sputtered at Lambert about the run-ins I have had with the medical-industrial complex. Lambert thought that a recent bout of issues were sufficiently bizarre that they merited a post. Perhaps they are specific to my oddball insurance set-up but even so, I never had this issue before: a surprising number of doctors refusing to accept cash (or more accurately, “self-pay”; I would use a credit card but the conversations that go pear-shaped never get that far) and...

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