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Tag Archives: Global Warming

Oil Industry’s Shift to Plastics in Question as Report Warns $400 Billion in Stranded Assets Possible

By Sharon Kelly, an attorney and freelance writer based in Philadelphia. She has reported for The New York Times, The Guardian, The Nation, National Wildlife, Earth Island Journal, and a variety of other publications.Originally published at DeSmogBlog. Off Africa’s eastern coast, north of Madagascar, lies Aldabra Atoll, a cluster of coral islands that surround a tropical lagoon. Aldabra is a UN World Heritage Site that’s home to a stunning array of wildlife, including tens of thousands of...

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Brazil’s Pantanal Wetland is On Fire, Joining Other Places Where Wildfires Rage or Have Recently Burned Out of Control

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. The West Coast apocalypse has crowded out much discussion of other wildfires. And as the southern hemisphere moves into its summer season, Australia is bracing itself that it doesn’t repeat last season’s armageddon. But many people are not aware that Brazil’s  Pantanal – the world’s largest wetland which is only one of the natural wonders of that...

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Topsoil Degradation, Soil Erosion, and Soil Governance (Global or Otherwise)

By Lambert Strether of Corrente I wish I could be doing a cheerful perambulation through soil taxonomies (again), but today I want to focus, at a high level, on two escalating problems with soil: The degradation of our (the world’s) topsoil, important because that’s where grow our food, at least so far; and the loss of soil as such, due to erosion (we just looked at the effects of erosion on river systems in considering sediment). The press seems to have addressed topsoil first, a couple of...

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How Charles Koch Is Buying Credibility With Academic Investments

Lambert here: Trust the science! Except when it’s bought and paid for, of course. By Tom Perrett, a researcher and contributor at DeSmogBlog. He has a long standing interest in environmentalism and political ecology, having undertaken a research project on degrowth for the Schumacher Institute. Originally published at DeSmogBlog. In 1996, Richard Fink, an executive at Koch Industries and a top advisor to Charles Koch, outlined a three-tiered strategy for getting the petrochemical...

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Climate Crisis and Population Growth Will Displace 1 Billion over Next 30 Years

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Yesterday was one of those days that I learned far more from the commentariat in their comments on my post about climate change and the Oregon wildfire crisis than I conveyed in my text, More than 500,000 People in Oregon Flee Wildfires. A half a million people have been displaced so far by the wildfire crisis in Oregon alone. Now, one thing the...

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More than 500,000 People in Oregon Flee Wildfires

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Oregon’s wildfire crisis has crept up as a surprise to me. No good reason why, as I’ve been keeping on top of the California armageddon, with three close friends who are affected – two who live in San Jose and one who grew up in Atascadero. He no longer lives there, but his mother and two sisters and their families do. I’ve been checking in with all...

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Robert Pollin: Biden Not Phasing Out Fossil Fuel, Relies on Carbon Capture

Yves here. Biden has managed to steer clear of saying much about his plans, and reports from Democratic party foot soldiers state that that is no accident. Frankly, I can’t believe he’s flogging capture, but it appears he thinks he can satisfy climate change activists without ruffling any carbon producers or users. Robert Pollin gives a detailed critique of Biden’s program in his talk with Paul Jay. I hate to sound negative about efforts to Do Something about accelerating global warming, but...

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Emergency Situation: The Slow-Moving Tragedy of the Russian Arctic

Yves here. This is an odd piece. While the subhead leads the reader to expect this to be mainly about environmental issues in the Russian Arctic, the focus instead is on the demise of towns that revolved around single employers. The authors act as if this is novel or some sort of Soviet holdover, when company towns were not uncommon in the US. I spent more than half my childhood living in company-owned housing, for instance: five houses in four towns (my father got a promotion in one place,...

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‘They Have Nowhere To Run’: Inmate Families, Advocates Push for Prisoner Release as California Wildfires Engulf State

Jerri-Lynn here. I share this Common Dreams post on inmates who are currently still confined to prisons that lie directly in the path of California wildfires for two reasons. First, there’s been far too little attention devoted to the plight of inmates during the COVID-19 pandemic. And second, I thought the commentariat might appreciate a chance to discuss the wildfires raging across California. They’re very much at the top of my mind, especially after telephone calls to two close friends...

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Earl Katz: Regenerative Agriculture and Massive Planting of Trees is Our Only Hope

Yves here. While this is an informative and wide-ranging talk about climate change, I have a couple of quibbles. One is about the history. I have no doubt that what Earl Katz recounts is accurate, but I believe he missed a critical development which wound up setting back environmental change, which perversely was the “Limits to Growth” study by the so-called Club of Rome. At least as far as the popular press was concerned,  “Limits to Growth”  for a time dominated the discussion of how...

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