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Tag Archives: Global Warming

A European Green Deal Will Not Work Without Refocusing Productivity

Lambert here: This is an EU-focused, supranational “Green Deal,” and so not directly comparable to the Green New Deal. However, I think that the same issues of productivity occur on either side of the Atlantic. By Karl Aiginger, Director, Policy Crossover Center: Vienna – Europe; Professor, Vienna University of Economics and Business. Originally published at VoxEU. The new president of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, has announced a “European Green Deal” and the Commission has...

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How Climate Change Influenced Australia’s Unprecedented Fires

Yves here. This post confirms the suspicions some have voiced about similarities between Australia’s and California’s fires. By Dana Nuccitelli. Originally published at Yale Climate Connections Australia’s frightening bushfires, which kicked off an early fire season in September 2019, have already had cataclysmic effects, and the continent is still just in the early months of the southern hemisphere’s summer. The New South Wales Rural Fire Service has described the bushfires as unprecedented...

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Like Adding ‘Five to Six Hiroshima Bombs of Heat Each Second,’ Study Shows Oceans Warming at Record Rate

Yves here. A short but grim bit of news on the climate change front, this on the oft-neglected topic of oceans. Recall the fact that oceans were acting as a heat sink fed complacency about climate change, since it ameliorated the impact of surface warming. By Eoin Higgins, staff writer at Common Dreams. Originally published at Common Dreams A new study published Monday shows that the Earth’s oceans reached the highest temperatures and warmed the fastest since records began, highlighting the...

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Conservative Win in Britain Means More Than Economic Trouble Ahead

Yves here. Just as with Trump, the press and public too often gets wound up in Boris Johnson’s dramas, and loses sight of the common-welfare-destroying policies that the Conservative Party has made its calling card. Although this post covers familiar terrain for Brexit readers, the high level overview may be  helpful for contacts who don’t keep close tabs. By Malcolm Sawyer, Emeritus Professor of Economics, Leeds University Business School. Originally published at the Institute for New...

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Plastic Watch: Senate Passes Save Our Seas Act 2.0

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. The Senate unanimously passed the Save Our Seas Act 2.0 Friday, a measure intended to reduce pollution of plastic waste. The first Save Our Seas Act of 2018 became law in 2o18 and has made no appreciable difference to the scourge of plastic pollution. A companion measure was introduced in the House of Representatives in July and action is  now needed...

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Fossil Fuel Interests Applaud Trump Administration’s Weakening of Major Environmental Law

By Dana Drugmand, a freelance writer and attorney who writes about climate issues. Originally published at DeSmog Blog Industry groups including oil and gas trade associations were quick to pile on the praise following President Trump’s announcement Thursday, January 9 of major overhauls to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The 50-year-old bedrock environmental statute requires federal agencies to review the environmental impacts of major actions or projects, and has been a key...

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2019 in Climate Science: A Continued Warming Trend and ‘Bleak’ Research

Yves here. I remember in 2007 when I was invited to an open house at the Explorers’ Club in New York City, which featured a day of presentations of scientists involved in research for that year’s Polar Year, a once-a-decade program of measurements and sightings in the Arctic. By then, it was clear to all those who’d been to the Arctic area recently, explorers as well as scientists, that warming in that polar region was already dramatic and alarming by historical standards. Yet this was still...

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‘Because Insects Are Key to Our Own Survival,’ 73 Scientists Unveil Global Roadmap to Battle Bugpocalypse

By Jessica Corbett, staff writer at Common Dreams. Originally published at Common Dreams Highlighting the “strong scientific consensus that the decline of insects, other arthropods, and biodiversity as a whole, is a very real and serious threat that society must urgently address,” 73 international scientists on Monday published a roadmap to battle the world’s “bugpocalypse.” The roadmap, published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, explains that a mountingbody of research shows “a...

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Australia’s Bushfires Are A Wake-Up Call: We Must Build A More Humane Economy Before It’S Too Late

Lambert here: Interesting theory of change. By Katherine Trebeck, a research and policy adviser with Oxfam. Originally published at Open Democracy. Back in the 1800s, scholars in the field of economics cast an envious glance at their colleagues in science. They envied physics, with its laws of gravity. They looked with green-eyes at those studying chemistry, with its elements and atoms. And they longingly admired their biologist chums with their categorisations and evolutionary adaptation....

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What if We Let the Oceans Into Our Cities?

Yves here. This idea for keeping cities on coasts is admittedly not ready for prime time. But one could argue it has bigger potential pitfalls than “what about sewage?” It’s “what about food?” Modern cities depend on farming that in most cases isn’t all that nearby, to state the obvious. By Nathanael Johnson (@savortooth on Twitter), Grist’s senior writer and the author of two books. Originally published at Grist The way we build our houses, roads, and cities reflects the great necessity of...

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