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Home / Tag Archives: Free markets and their discontents

Tag Archives: Free markets and their discontents

The Agribusiness Alliance for a Green Revolution Failed Africa

Yves here. Agriculture/food sustainability expert Tim Wise speaks to Lynn Fries on how the promise that “modern,” as in “green revolution” or Big Ag approaches would revolutionize food production in poor nations and reduce hunger. Revolutionize they sure did, but not in the way they promised, in terms of results. As Wise explains, this push to displace small farmers and traditional practices hasn’t simply enriched foreign business interests. It has increased hunger. By Lynn Fries. Originally...

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John Deere Strike: A Union Member Explains How Bad Faith Dealings Produced Today’s Grievances

Yves here. Reader TroyIA, who works at John Deere, has graciously provided us with an important background to strike, most of all the too-clever provisions that management won in past contract negotiations that turned out markedly worse for union members than they were led to believe. A centerpiece is the hated incentive plan CIPP, which not only due to tricks and traps regularly fails to yield any payments despite a unit appearing to hit targets, but can even deliver negative payments, as in...

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Spike in Energy Prices Suggests That Sharp Changes Are Ahead

Yves here. Leroy R recommended the last Gail Tverberg piece, where she broadens out from her usual focus on energy to the issues of complexity and collapse. I decided to repost it because it’s meaty and thus likely to provoke a good discussion. That said, while I agree completely with her overview statement, that the trend towards complexity has gone too far, I have to beg to differ with her in making energy a central driver. What has made the increase in “complexity” destabilizing is that it...

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Brexit: David Frost’s Bluster Can’t Wish Away the Northern Ireland Protocol

Yves here. I am behind in providing an update on the state of Brexit, now that the UK has officially gotten stroppy over the Northern Ireland protocol and the EU has formulated some fixed. But this openDemocracy piece provides a good overview of the issues in play, especially the UK’s belief that it holds a trump card in its threat to trigger an Article 16 dispute. Regular readers will note that the UK, true to form, is overplaying its hand. By George Peretz, a queen’s counsel in England and...

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Officials Double Down on “Let ‘Er Rip” Strategy, Placing Undue Faith in Vaccines as Regions With High Vaccinations Suffer Infection Spikes

Again and again, all over the world, we’ve seen public health officials all too willing to relax Covid restrictions too early, resulting in an eventual spike in infections and hospitalizations. As we’ll explain, regulators are repeating the same experiment and expecting different outcomes, The classic example was the May CDC “Mission Accomplished” policy change of telling the fully vaccinated they could go about unmasked, even as Delta had become the dominant strain, had viral loads 1000x...

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The John Deere Strike: Organized Labor’s Turning Point?

There’s a lot of excitement, at least among those of the pro-worker persuasion, about employees rejecting poorly paid jobs and oppressive bosses via not taking up open positions or demanding change via strikes. A partial list: Volvo. Kellogg’s. Frito-Lay. Nabisco. Alabama coal miners. Health care staffers in New York and Massachusetts, along with bus drivers and telecom workers. Even though they are highly visible signs that the serfs are rebelling, these labor actions are still a strong of...

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Michael Hudson: Super Imperialism, 3rd Edition

Yves here. Congrats to Michael Hudson for reissuing Super Imperialism. How many writers have books that have withstood the test of time? Hudson bought back the rights from his publisher and revised and updated it. If you haven’t read Super-Imperialism, now is the time to make up for that lapse. Or you can donate at Hudson’s Paetron page. The updated and expanded 3rd edition of Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire is now available. This highly respected study of U.S....

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Never Mind the Pandora Papers: Why Secrecy Still Rules in the UK

Yves here. Our Richard Smith provides a broader look into the question of why so little has changed on the secrecy front despite a fair bit of press and even some regulatory and legislative efforts to rein it in. The short version is: “It’s hard!” but there are specific devices the shadowy money types employ to evade what to most would seem to be pretty clear-cut rules. Our Richard Smith is back! As you can see below, he’s a co-author of a new piece at openDemocracy on a favorite topic: how...

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Mzukisi Qobo: The Old Mantra About Growth Has Reached Exhaustion

Yves here. This is a very informative discussion, both on how South Africa and its neighbors have responded to Covid, and even more important, how they are thinking about development in light of resource pressures and relocalization. I suspect you’ll find this talk with Mzukisi Qobo to be far more insightful and nuanced than what you encounter from the overwhelming majority of first world economists. By Folashadé Soulé, Advisor, Commission on Global Economic Transformation and Senior Research...

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The Neverending Brexit: Flailing Johnson Set to Try to Renege on Commitment to Respect Good Friday Agreement

Our Brexit brain trust (Clive, Colonel Smithers, David, PlutoniumKun and vlade) have had an extended and very informative discussion of an impending Brexit spat in the Telegraph, over the unresolved sore point of the Northern Ireland protocol, as in the irritant of the promise to respect the Good Friday Agreement. Even though they have important nuances in their views, they are largely on the same page and I hope to give a recap that doesn’t offend any of them. Note that this sighting may...

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