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Tag Archives: FOMC

Waiting on the Calvary

Engaged in one of those protectionist trade spats people have been talking about, the flow of goods between South Korea and Japan has been choked off. The specific national reasons for the dispute are immaterial. As trade falls off everywhere, countries are increasingly looking to protect their own. Nothing new, this is a feature of when prolonged stagnation turns to outright contraction. While the dispute with Japan hasn’t helped, it isn’t responsible for the level of decline the Republic of...

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Much More Than This Week (TRDKWTAD)

According to the recent release of the Federal Reserve’s projected forecasts, that’s it. It wasn’t one and done like Chairman Powell had initially indicated, this “midcycle adjustment” hits two. And that is it, at least if you believe the current calculations spit out by the Fed’s models. It goes along with Powell’s blunt statement he made at the press conference on Wednesday broadcasting the second cut. The cut had already been superseded, big time, by events in money markets. Most people...

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FOMC: Trust Us, Funding Pressures Don’t Really Matter

Before the repo rumble this week, Federal Reserve Chairman Jay Powell wanted to coast into a second rate cut on the comforting breeze of his insurance rhetoric. No longer one and done, that’s done, a second straight cut would be more consistent with a more forceful yet unnecessary policy response. Again, his publicly stated view is that the US needs rate cuts even though it doesn’t need them. Losing control of fed funds simply wasn’t in the plan. It’s hard to argue there’s no need for...

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An Overlooked And Important Point: The Fed’s Overnight Repo Operation Had Less To Do With Repo Than You Are Led To Believe

There is one additional important point to note in all this repo uproar. Why did the Fed conduct the overnight repo operation this morning? The answer isn’t what you might think. It sounds like officials particularly at the Open Market Desk sounded the alarm about repo and the FOMC forcefully responded. And if you think that, policymakers would be beyond thrilled because that’s just what they want you to think. Expectations-based policy demands that you believe in a competent central bank...

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The Path Clear For More Rate Cuts, If You Like That Sort of Thing

If you like rate cuts and think they are powerful tools to help manage a soft patch, then there was good news in two international oil reports over the last week. The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) cut its forecast for global demand growth for the seventh straight month. On Friday, the International Energy Agency (IEA) downgraded its estimates for the third time in four months. That wasn’t all, as the EIA’s report focused in on some more sobering aspects of the US economy....

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Sure, One and Done

The FOMC yesterday reiterated their stance that the economy was strong. But they also hedged. A one-and-done rate cut is one thing, some insurance (allegedly) for keeping the good times rolling. What about QT, though? That’s the funny thing that you can’t help but get stuck on. Not bank reserves, mind you, they’re worthless (perhaps literally). Rather, Federal Reserve officials appear to be experiencing that sinking feeling, too. QT was supposed to continue unabated until the level of...

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The Correlations Behind The Rate Cut(s)

In every likelihood, the Federal Reserve today is going to join other central banks around the world who have already cut rates. It is the synchronized signal completing the turn from globally synchronized growth into a globally synchronized downturn. To most people in the United States, at least, this is a puzzling shift.   The unemployment rate says things are rock solid. Only seven months ago, the same Federal Reserve officials now voting for “additional accommodation” were then...

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Rate Cuts Will Not Be The Fed’s First Insurance Policy

I don’t think anyone really noticed the timing because nobody really noticed it had happened. What took place last year qualifies as a big deal in the world of central banking and moneyless monetary policy. The lack of clarity about it as well as what sure looks like indecision portrays an intellectual foundation at odds with public perception. First, the timing. The middle of 2018 should not have needed any shift toward the inflationary. As officials were quick to point out, the boom was...

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Seven Points on the ECB and the Price Action

1. As soon as it was clear that the ECB was not easing today, the euro began to recover, after making a marginal new low for the year (just above $1.11). 2. Draghi made it clear that easing was going to be delivered in September and on several fronts including rates (with mitigating measures like tiering) and new asset purchases (not decided on instruments, which plays into speculation of equity purchases—though I strongly doubt this will materialize). 3. In addition to adding...

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What Does It Mean That Real Estate, Not Equities, Is Driving Monetary Policy?

In the world of assets classes, I don’t believe it is equities which hold the Federal Reserve’s attention. After the 2006-11 debacle, the big bust, you can at least understand why policymakers might be more attuned to real estate no matter how the NYSE trades. It may be a decade ago, but that’s the one thing out of the Global Financial Crisis which was seared into the consciousness of everyone who lived through it. From the general public to politicians, don’t screw up housing. It’s also the...

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