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Tag Archives: EuroDollar

Why So Much Fuss Over SOFR?

More than two years into the SOFR regime, it’s not really going all that well. Adoption remains, shall we say, questionable and uncertain even though, everyone says, LIBOR is on its way out and the Secured Overnight Financing Rate is the future. Jumbled together by the Fed’s New York branch, the latter is, we are told, superior in every conceivable way. Tell that to Chicago. Over on the CME, what you find in actual trading is no discernable decline in eurodollar futures volume and open...

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Why 2014? Less (Big) Banks, Fewer ‘Dollars’, No Growth

One of the biggest reasons why I always find the regulations explanation(s) so lacking is because of what is the biggest part of the scientific process. The excuses for problems in global liquidity and the dollar-based banking system in general have run the gamut of regulatory exercises. Who can forget, for one example, 2a7? That was 2016’s preferred explanation for a range of imbalances and “anomalies” that showed up at seemingly the most inopportune time. Always “unexpectedly.” The...

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Not Abating, Not By A Longshot

Since I advertised the release last week, here’s Mexico’s update to Industrial Production in November 2019. The level of production was estimated to have fallen by 1.8% from November 2018. It was up marginally on a seasonally-adjusted basis from its low in October. That doesn’t sound like much, -1.8%, but apart from recent months this would’ve been the third worst result since 2009. Mexico has rarely experienced that kind of seemingly mild contraction. It signals how something has...

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Global Headwinds and Disinflationary Pressures

I’m going to go back to Mexico for the third day in a row. First it was imports (meaning Mexico’s exports) then automobile manufacturing and now Industrial Production. I’ll probably come back to this tomorrow when INEGI updates that last number for November 2019. For now, through October will do just fine, especially in light of where automobile production is headed (ICYMI, off the bottom of the charts). Mexico is, as I’ve been writing this week, the presumed winner of trade wars. You might...

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The Word Is: Prolongada

You don’t have to tell Mexico the bad news about how US auto sales ended 2019. They already know; in fact, knew ahead of time. Production workers who should be busy building more and more new cars for sale outside of Mexico, particularly for prospective American owners, must instead be worried if they’ll still have a job if things go on like this. The global economy is on the mend, they say. Yet, there are so many signs that it isn’t. In a lot of important places, getting worse sometimes...

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The Real Trade Dilemma

When I write that there are no winners around the world, what I mean is more comprehensive than just the trade wars. On that one narrow account, of course there are winners and losers. The Chinese are big losers, as the Census Bureau numbers plainly show (as well as China’s own). But even the winners of the trade wars find themselves wondering where all the spoils are. They may be winners because of it but somehow they all still end up in the losing column. Late in 2018, in response to the...

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Which Way Is Japan Really Leaning (Which Means For A Whole Lot More Than Japan)?

Last year’s landmine was a global affair. It wasn’t just US markets and the US economy which were so negatively impacted by it. Since it originated in the eurodollar system, the landmine (its effects) spread pretty much to all corners of the globe. Take Japan, for example. There really isn’t any (other) reason why October 2018 should show up in data series after data series. Yet, it does. Interpretations of Japanese economic figures have been clouded of late by the VAT tax hike which the Abe...

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Listen To China: Managed Decline, Not ‘Stimulus’

So much of the growth scare scenario relies upon China’s willingness to end it. By count of conventional Economics, there cannot be a case where a country like China just sits back and lets the economy fall into (further) decay. The argument will always devolve into some form of debate as to economic potential, but surely in a place like that such a thing is up from here not down. Perversely, the more the Chinese economy slows the more Western commentary assures anyone who will listen to...

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Everything Comes Down To Which Way The Dollar Is Leaning

Is the global economy on the mend as everyone at least here in America is now assuming? For anyone else to attempt to answer that question, they might first have to figure out what went wrong in the first place. Most have simply assumed, and continue to assume, it has been fallout from the “trade wars.” That is a demonstrably false guess, one easily dispelled by the facts. A trade war produces winners from its losers. But we cannot find a single one. There have only been losers. The most...

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Out Of The Onion Wars, Why Are There Only Losers?

Whereas China is embroiled in pig wars, its neighbor India is waging one against onions. African swine fever has decimated the former’s stock of hogs, leading to rapidly rising food prices at maybe the worst possible time. On the Indian subcontinent, same result as far as prices only in this case late monsoons have swamped the onion harvest. The shortage has been so bad it led the Modi government to halt exports of the vegetable in order to keep enough supply in-country; therefore, prices...

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