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Tag Archives: EuroDollar

That Can’t Be Good: China Unveils Another ‘Market Reform’

The Chinese have been reforming their monetary and credit system for decades. Liberalization has been an overriding goal, seen as necessary to accompany the processes which would keep the country’s economic “miracle” on track. Or get it back on track, as the case may be. Authorities had traditionally controlled interest rates through various limits and levers. It wasn’t until October 2004, for example, that the upper limit on lending rates was rescinded. In August 2006, the mortgage rate...

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Why Go After Hong Kong?

There may yet be bitter irony in the fact that China’s nascent embrace of capitalism in the late eighties allowed it to survive the wave of failed socialist states which fell all throughout the world at the time. While the Berlin Wall came down, the Eastern bloc nearly disappeared, and even the Soviet Union dissolved, the Chinese would stand almost alone as whatever was left of the Communist dream. But while Beijing had come through in the nineties and transformed China into a modern...

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Why You Should Care Argentina More and More Looks Like Argentina

Why don’t you fight the Fed? Sure, central banks and governments give off the impression that they are in control. The idea is repeated as if a fact. We are led to believe they let markets play around in their contained spheres but should anyone get out of hand authorities are there like referees to make sure everything remains inbounds. Whenever a price or an asset class approaches the boundary, woe be it to whomever might challenge the almighty holder of the printing press. Yet, we see all...

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When A Bond Bull Becomes A Raving Stock Bull

Over the last few years, I have continually battled the “bond bears” about calls for higher rates simply because rates were low.  Here is a short list of some of the more prominent calls for higher rates: Those are just a few, and certainly, there were many other calls for higher rates from every corner of Wall Street. One of the biggest issues with the predictions of rising 10-year bond yields, which started in earnest in 2013, is they have been consistently wrong. For a bit of history, you...

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Eurodollar University: With Each Passing Year, August 9 Becomes More Not Less Important

The anniversary actually seems more poignant with each passing year. You would think it would be easy to get used to it, or at least become numb and normalized for the deep inflection it had represented. But the more everything stays the same the closer you are pulled to going back in time and rethinking things from the start. How the hell can it have reached twelve years? That in and of itself is a tremendous intuitive hurdle; it doesn’t seem that it could ever be possible in this very...

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The Myth of CNY DOWN = STIMULUS Won’t Die

On the one hand, it’s a small silver lining in how many even in the mainstream are beginning to realize that there really is something wrong. Then again, they are using “trade wars” to make sense of how that could be. For the one, at least they’ve stopped saying China’s economy is strong and always looks resilient no matter what data comes out. Even after all that supposed “stimulus” starting in the middle of last year it’s time to acknowledge how ineffective it has been. But in doing so, the...

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The Real Power Behind Currency Wars

It’s another one of those things that just blows up the whole convention, another pretty clear sign that the mainstream has it all backward. We are seeing it play out right now with China. The Chinese are being accused of unfair currency manipulation, the sort of “competitive devaluation” that fills whole chapters in the Keynesian Economics textbooks. The idea is simple and seemingly intuitive: you reduce the value of your currency against mine making it relatively cheaper for the world to...

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Yield Plunge: Running Out of Dollars, and Excuses

As of today’s close, there are only 22 trading days in the entire history of Japan’s government bonds (JGB) where the yield (or “yield”) on its 10-year paper has been more negative. Those 22 all came clustered together in June and July 2016. In other words, Japan’s bond market is today comparable only to that one period at the utter depths of Euro$ #3. This Euro$ #4 isn’t just a US problem or one for Europe. There is no either/or. It is perfectly clear in showing up across all the majors, as...

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Chart(s) of the Week: You Were Saying Rate Cut?

We’ve got repo, erratic federal funds market, German 2s correlated with it, plunging bond yields, angry swaps (IR and FX), and economic data increasingly and more speedily in the wrong direction. Overseas official entities piled even more into the foreign repo pool, their payments dollar buffer, another definitive sign of a much more acute dollar shortage worldwide. Is it even possible to add anything else that would make this all seem worse? Oh yeah, China’s ticking clock just expired,...

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There’s Dollar In The Rate Cut, But Not Nearly Enough Dollar

The insurance rate cut has been issued. Telling the assembled members of the press this is nothing more than a “mid-cycle adjustment”, Chairman Powell was cautious not to betray too much concern. The first rule of central banking is not to make anything worse. Subprime must always be contained. Yet, he has the unenviable task of explaining what is a complete (and for many an unnecessary) 180-degree turnaround. Mere months ago, inflation and acceleration, an economy risking becoming too good....

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