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Tag Archives: eurodollar system

So Much Dollar Bull

According to the Federal Reserve’s calculations, the US dollar in Q1 pulled off its best quarter in more than twenty years – though it really didn’t need the full quarter to do it. The last time the Fed’s trade-weighed dollar index managed to appreciate farther than the 7.1% it had in the first three months of 2020, the year was 1997 during its final quarter when almost the whole of Asia was just about to get clobbered.In second place (now third) for the dollar’s best, Q4...

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So Much Bond Bull

Count me among the bond vigilantes. On the issue of supply I yield (pun intended) to no one. The US government is the brokest entity humanity has ever conceived – and that was before March 2020. There will be a time, if nothing is done, where this will matter a great deal.That time isn’t today nor is it tomorrow or anytime soon because it’s the demand side which is so confusing and misdirected. Realizing this is true does not cancel your vigilantism. For two years now we’ve heard about how...

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No Flight To Recognize Shortage

If there’s been one small measure of progress, and a needed one, it has been the mainstream finally pushing commentary into the right category. Back in ’08, during the worst of GFC1 you’d hear it all described as “flight to safety.” That, however, didn’t correctly connote the real nature of what was behind the global economy’s dramatic wreckage. Flight to safety, whether Treasuries or dollars, wasn’t it.Back in March, while “it” was very obvious, even the New York Times put it the right way...

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Overseas Dollar Swaps Are Not As Overseas As You Think

People quite often want to know what I have against the Fed’s swaps. To begin with, they are sourced by bank reserves. My co-host partner Emil Kalinowski likes to say these latter are the equivalent of laundromat tokens, an analogy I can at least get behind. They are monetary in appearance but of (extremely) limited use. Maybe a more comprehensive way of thinking about the Fed’s form of reserves is to equate them with gluten. This is a non-nutritious filler whose widespread purpose is to...

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The Big Picture’s Going To Need More Than Magic Words

What connects March 2020 with February 2008 as well as the Crash of ’87 all then with the Great Contraction which initiated the Great Depression? If you said economic and financial chaos, you’d be partly right. There wasn’t really much or any of that in 1987, though there was with the other three. People including politicians and central bankers don’t seem to be aware of the difference. For those who grew up on the old Sesame Street cartoons, one of these things is not like the others. But...

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Weimar Ben Didn’t Happen, So Now Weimar Jay?

Anna Jacobson Schwartz often gets buried under the mountains of study Milton Friedman conducted on his own. Contrary to what some, perhaps many, might think, Friedman didn’t write A Monetary History by himself. Anna Schwartz was his co-author for what would become one of the most important volumes of economic scholarship of the entire 20th century.Pretty much every central bank in operation today lifts its policies directly from the book’s pages. Quantitative easing sounded new and radical...

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Being Forced To Be More Precise About The Most Serious Terms

He called it “unfair competition.” That’s one way to describe it, surely not the proper way. But who could blame the guy? After all, these were not normal times though at the time hardly anyone had yet realized it.James J. Davis was the second person to hold the title Secretary of Labor. Appointed by Warren Harding, he began his tenure in March 1921 and would ultimately serve three American Presidents (Coolidge and Hoover both kept him on), a feat still unmatched. Shortly before the end of...

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Can You Quota The World Into Recovery?

Saudi Arabia once burned through the bond market on par with demand for Argentina’s paper. During the 2016-17 globally synchronized growth-inspire Eurobond binge, the country made up for its lost oil revenues (oil crash and all) with dollar-denominated, offshore debt flotations. These merely stabilized the country’s forex reserves after they had collapsed (by a third) alongside benchmark Brent crude prices 2014-16 (the most direct deflationary consequence of Euro$ #3).Having done nothing to...

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COT Black: No Love For Super-Secret Models

As I’ve said, it is a threefold failure of statistical models. The first being those which showed the economy was in good to great shape at the start of this thing. Widely used and even more widely cited, thanks to Jay Powell and his 2019 rate cuts plus “repo” operations the calculations suggested the system was robust.Because of this set of numbers, officials here as well as elsewhere around the world chose the most extreme form of pandemic mitigations, trusting that the strong economy...

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An International Puppet Show

It’s actually pretty easy to see why the IMF is in a hurry to secure more resources. I’m not talking about potential bailout candidates banging down the doors; that’s already happened. The fund itself is doing two contradictory things simultaneously: telling the world, repeatedly, that it has a highly encouraging $1 trillion in bailout capacity at the same time it goes begging to vastly increase that amount.Very reassuring. The IMF is becoming like the Federal Reserve. Before GFC1, it had a...

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