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Tag Archives: Euro$ #4

China’s Financial Stability: A Squeeze and a Strangle

I do get a big kick out of the way Communists over in China announce how they are dealing with their enormous problems especially as they may be getting worse. Each month, for example, the country’s National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) will publish figures on retail sales or industrial production at record lows but in the opening paragraphs the text will be full of praise for how the economy is being handled. If you thought the Western media was liberal with the word “strong” (经济强劲, I...

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Regardless of Recession, We’ve Already Got The Downturn And That’s What Actually Matters

The Chicago Fed’s National Activity Index (NAI) fell pretty sharply in October. At -0.71, that’s a reading which suggests the US economy may be operating significantly below trend. Fifty-eight of the 85 monthly indicators which make up the statistic made negative contributions. Of course, “below trend” is an imprecise term and doesn’t by itself stand up to the one question for which everyone wants an answer. Recession or not? While that’s where the public’s interest mostly comes in,...

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How About Midpoint Decoupling?

With some PMI’s in the US on somewhat of an upswing, it already raises the issue of a midpoint in their trend. Given how the US data is pretty isolated in that way, could there also be midpoint decoupling? That’s what we would have to believe if the “bottom is in” folks have it right, those like Jay Powell who are arguing the worst is behind us (even if risks remain). Remember that the idea of decoupling has already once been dashed during this eurodollar cycle. In 2018, while renewed (and...

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Do PMI Trends Have A Midpoint?

It was a huge sigh of relief, seen as confirmation of the word “transitory.” Oil prices in late 2014 had crashed and while globally monetary officials tried to reassure everyone it was a good thing, a supply glut giving consumers something like a tax cut, the wipeout was still unnerving. And that uneasy feeling was reinforced by forward-looking economic data that ended 2014 on an increasingly sour note. Early 2015, however, it began to look much better. Janet Yellen, in particular, had found...

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Another Perfect Example of the Euro$ Squeeze

Earlier this month, the Statistics Bureau of Japan had reported an enormous surge in household outlays. For the month of September 2019, the Japanese had splurged on everything from big ticket items to regular discretionary products. Total spending in the month was up 9.5% year-over-year in real terms, an enormous increase which had been the fastest pace ever recorded in data that dates back more than half a century. The reason for the increase was simple: the looming VAT tax hike. In...

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Retail Sales Make It Two Toward The Second Act

One monthly result does not make a trend. Two? Still not a trend, but edging closer to one and more solid analysis. If making a claim based off the potential for one high frequency result is going out on a limb, then a second result confirming the first while not yet solid ground is at least a bit thicker of a limb. Last month, we talked about patterns and how there were distinct ones when it came to certain aspects of these eurodollar problems. One example is the bond market and how it gives...

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The Midpoint

The idea of a midpoint can be misleading in that we might immediately think of one in terms of time. The middle being exactly in the middle, halfway from the beginning while also halfway to the end. A midpoint need not be so pedant. In looser usage, it can instead denote merely the separation in between two otherwise irregularly spaced trends. Trade wars and QE’s, not-QE’s and confidence. For the longest time during 2019, the global bond market had prevented the itchy desires of many in...

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Why The Japanese Are Suddenly Messing With YCC

While the world’s attention was fixated on US$ repo for once, the Bank of Japan held a policy meeting and turned in an even more “dovish” performance. Likely the global central bank plan had been to combine the Fed’s second rate cut with what amounted to a simultaneous Japanese pledge for more “stimulus” in October. Both of those followed closely an ECB which got itself back in the QE business once more. But all that likely coordinated “accommodation” was spoiled once the fed funds rate poked...

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Stuck at A: Repo Chaos Isn’t Something New, It’s The Same Baseline

Finally, finally the global bond market stopped going in a straight line. I write often how nothing ever does, but for almost three-quarters of a year the guts of the financial system seemed highly motivated to prove me wrong. Yields plummeted and eurodollar futures prices soared. It is only over the past few weeks that rates have backed up in what has been the first real selloff since last year. Is this a meaningful change? It may seem that way in certain places. The ECB has launched a more...

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Retail Math, Stock Sentiment

According to the Census Bureau, auto sales in the US may be on the upswing. Rising 6.8% year-over-year in August, it was the highest rate in nearly three years for retail sales of automobiles. This follows an upward revised 6.3% increase during July, the best back-to-back months in the beleaguered sector since the end of 2016. Are auto sales experiencing a rebound in the second half of 2019, just as Jay Powell has been predicting for the overall American economy? Or is it just another...

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