Friday , October 22 2021
Home / Tag Archives: environment

Tag Archives: environment

Swimming With Sharks in the Maldives

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. I’m currently holed up in our place in Brooklyn and missing my former pre-Covid peripatetic life very much. Yet I’m far from unique in this regard. A piece in Friday’s Guardian made me feel very wistful, These Maldives islanders once saw sharks as the threat. Now they fear the plasti. I learned to dive in the Maldives, earning my PADI certificates:...

Read More »

Supply Chain Crisis; A Brooklyn View

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Lots of recent sturm und drang regarding the global supply chain crisis.. These problems have yet to hit us, although I suppose it might be prudent to stock up on toilet papa= I continue to plow my small furrow, on the essential issues – food, basically. Which means what  buy from the NYC greenmarket, supplemented local store.s As topped up by...

Read More »

In 2021, US on Pace for Most Billion-Dollar Weather Disasters Since Records Began

By Kenny Stancil, staff writer at Common Dreams. Originally published at Common Dreams The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Tuesday in its latest monthly report that the United States endured 18 “billion-dollar weather and climate disasters” through the first nine months of 2021, putting this year on pace to be among the worst for such catastrophes. For decades, scientists have sounded the alarm that extreme weather would become more frequent and intense amid the...

Read More »

On the Economic Geography of Climate Change

By Giovanni Peri, Professor of Economics and Director, University of California, Davis. and Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, Professor of Economics, University of Geneva. Originally published at VoxEU. Climate change is a defining challenge of our times. This column introduces a special issue of the Journal of Economic Geography on climate change, which provides foundations for well-informed policymaking by addressing two main themes of the economic geography of climate change. First, climate change...

Read More »

Jackpot Readiness: The (Literal) Pressure Cooker

By Lambert Strether of Corrente And now for something completely different. Commenters to Yves’ post on rationing were discussing how cook and store food under conditions of “disruption and shortages,” as alert reader Eclair put it, discussing the Amish. It occurred to me that the Jackpot would be the ultimate form of rationing, albeit imposed opportunistically. Reader Hotflash mentioned pressure canning, but that’s too ambitious for me; I’m nervous about the botulism the way others are...

Read More »

Waste Watch: Ocean Cleanup Yields Meager Results

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Ocean Cleanup. the much-hyped project to collect plastic waste from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, limped back into port recently. yielding merger results, Now, I’m loath to criticize this endeavor, as we must certainty clean up our environmental  messes. Yet what worries me about this project is that some might think that this technofix can...

Read More »

Can the Economy Afford NOT To Fight Climate Change?

Yves here. If humans are fortunate enough merely to suffer a Jackpot rather than a full-bore collapse, perhaps future historians will try to make sense of why individuals and governments did pretty much squat to prevent climate change even when they recognized it really was well underway and would produce very bad outcomes. I imagine that one of those things that they will find unfathomable, being on the other side of the climate disaster, is the ability to rationalize inaction. A big aid in...

Read More »

Global Coral Coverage Down by Half Since the 1950s

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. A study published in the journal OneEarth on Friday describes the drastic decline in the health of the world’s coral reefs since the 1950s, Global decline in capacity of coral reefs to provide ecosystem services. From the summary: Coral reefs worldwide are facing impacts from climate change, overfishing, habitat destruction, and pollution. The...

Read More »

New York Bans Sale of Fossil Fuel Vehicles From 2034 Onward

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. The state of New York this week passed a law that bans the sale of fossil fuel powered vehicles after 2034. This deadline applies to all new passenger vehicles, making New York the second state to move forward with such a plan, following California’s lead. Last September, California Governor Gavin Newsom issued an executive order directing the...

Read More »

There’s One Surefire Way to End Big Sewage Spills: End Big Sewage

By Chelsea Wald, an award-winning science and environmental journalist based in the Netherlands, author of “Pipe Dreams: The Urgent Global Quest to Transform the Toilet.” Originally published at Undark. Call it the summer of sewage. In July, Los Angeles’ Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant, the city’s largest municipal wastewater treatment facility, spilled 17 million gallons of raw sewage into Santa Monica Bay after an unexpected surge of debris overwhelmed the plant, resulting in beach...

Read More »