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Tag Archives: environment

Are We Prepared for Pandora’s Box of Climate Catastrophes?

By Simon Whalley, an educator in Japan, the co-founder of Extinction Rebellion Japan and the author of the upcoming book, Dear Indy: A Heartfelt Plea From a Climate Anxious Father. Originally published at CommonDreams Will this be the summer we all remember what we were doing? A monstrous landslide after record rainfall in Japan left fifteen dead and dozens missing. Biblical flooding in Germany has caused hundreds of deaths with many more unaccounted for. More than a million acres of the west...

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World’s Coral Scientists Warn Action is Needed Now to Save Even a Few Reefs from Climate Change

By Sam Purkis Professor and Chair of the Department of Marine Sciences, University of Miami. Originally published at The Conversation. The Chagos Archipelago is one of the most remote, seemingly idyllic places on Earth. Coconut-covered sandy beaches with incredible bird life rim tropical islands in the Indian Ocean, hundreds of miles from any continent. Just below the waves, coral reefs stretch for miles along an underwater mountain chain. It’s a paradise. At least it was before the heat...

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The U.S. Shale Revolution Has Surrendered to Reality

Yves here. We picked up on the observation of the Financial Times’ John Dizard many years ago: that the shale industry would continue to engage in fundamentally unprofitable drilling as long as operators could borrow money, and that would continue for quite a while. The day of reckoning has finally arrived. By Justin Mikulka, a freelance investigative journalist with a degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Cornell University. Originally published at DeSmog Blog Image: Fossil...

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The Conflict Within OPEC Is Far From Over

Yves here. Now that inflation prospects are a big concern among investors and economic commentators, oil prices and therefore OPEC squabbles are in focus too. Recall that in 2008, many experts contend that the runup in commodity prices, and in particular gas rising to over $4 at the pump, helped push overleveraged consumers over the edge. While oil prices are no where near as elevated, they are still up a great deal from their Covid-suppressed levels. That’s enough to stress consumers and...

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Industry Calls the Climate Shots in the Biden Administration

Yves here. So what Biden promise did you choose to believe? “Nothing fundamental will change” which means among other things continuing Obama Administration headfakes like promoting environmentally destructive fracking and engaging in hand waves like joining the toothless Paris climate accords in the waning days of his second term? Or feel good campaign blather? It’s not hard to guess which pledge was the one that mattered. By Thomas Neuburger. Originally published at God’s Spies Don’t miss...

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‘Wake Up Call’: Rapidly Thawing Permafrost Threatens Trans-Alaska Pipeline

By Common Dreams Staff. Originally published at Common Dreams Alaska’s thawing permafrost is undermining the supports that hold up an elevated section of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, putting in danger the structural integrity of one of the world’s largest oil pipelines. In a worst-case scenario, a rupture of the pipeline would result in an oil spill in a delicate and remote landscape where it would be extremely difficult to clean up. “This is a wake-up call,” said Carl Weimer, of Pipeline...

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Book Review: The History of Animal-Based Medicine in China

Yves here. It’s remarkable to learn that there’s been almost no study of the history and use of much decried Chinese animal-based treatments. But it should come as no surprise that modern use has more to do with mercenary motives than supposed “traditional culture”. By Rachel Love Nuwer. Originally published at Undark IZ P.Y. CHEE vividly remembers the first time she visited a bear farm. It was 2009, and Chee, who was working for a Singapore-based animal welfare group, flew to Laos to tour a...

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An Independence Day Reflection: How the Rich Plan to Rule a Burning World

Yves here. It isn’t a far reach to argue that the creation over the last 20 or so years of a stronger surveillance and control apparatus is part of a long-term plan, above all to protect the powerful and rich. Remember, for instance, that in the early 2000s, Pentagon strategists were warning of coming destabilizing mass migrations, triggered by climate change. However, having lived in NYC during Hurricane Sandy, I need to correct part of his post. First, the dark zone in Manhattan was roughly...

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‘Megadrought’ Along Border Strains US-Mexico Water Relations

Yves here. While this post provides an important example about how water is becoming a political, and even a geopolitical flash point, it fails to mention the big reason the US is making such heavy demands on the Colorado River: often profligate water use by the California agriculture industry. California grows almonds, even though the water cost of a single almond is a gallon. Other nuts require similar high water rations, but almonds are far and away the most popular. Astonishingly,...

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NZ to Ban Some Single Use Plastics, Following a Familiar Distressing Pattern

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. New Zealand environment minister David Parker today announced plans to ban some single-use plastic products, beginning next year and phased in over three stages by July 2025. Despite its reputation as a green paradise – in part fostered by Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings film trilogy – New Zealand is currently one of the top 10 per-capita producers...

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