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Tag Archives: environment

Right to Repair: Saves Consumers Money, Promotes Local Jobs Rather than Global Supply Chains

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. The pandemic has caused people to spend more time in their homes, inflicting greater wear and tear on their electronics and other household appliances. In previous right to repair posts, I’ve stressed the environmental benefits that follow both from reducing elections waste, as well as not producing unnecessary items in the first place. When devices...

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Drought-Stricken Colorado River Basin Could See Additional 20% Drop in Water Flow by 2050

Yves here. In parts of the West, water rights have long been hotly contested. Potable water is the natural resource that is projected to come into serious shortage first. That makes management of resources like the Colorado River of critical importance, yet the bodies responsible for its stewardship are late to come to grips with the impact of perma-droughts By Jan Ellen Spiegel. Originally published at Yale Climate Connections Colorado is no stranger to drought. The current one is closing...

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Flint Water Crisis: Michigan AG Poised to Indict Ex-Gov Snyder, Other Officials, Later This Week, But on What Charges?

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. The Associated Press reports in Michigan plans to charge ex-Gov. Snyder in Flint water probe that former Michigan Rick Snyder will later be criminally charged for actions related to the Flint water crisis. The AP report is sparse on key details, as are all the follow-on reports I have seen. I turn to the Detroit News account, Michigan plans to charge...

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Coming Attraction: IPCC’s Upcoming Major Climate Assessment

Yves here. “Attraction” isn’t exactly the word I’d use for the IPPC climate reports due out in 2021 and 2022, unless you are the sort that enjoys renderings of a freight train bearing down on you. However, for climate change activists, the IPPC studies are critical rallying points, both for reinforcing the urgency of taking action and for getting behind some (many?) of their recommendations. By Bob Henson. Originally published at Yale Climate Connections Despite the speed bump posed by the...

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The Clams of Poland’s Municipal Water Plants (and Other Biosensors)

Lambert here: Patient readers (and moderators) I’m leaving the comments on for this one, because my biosphere posts often get comments from teachers, and people who are far more knowledgeable than I am. Please stay on point. –lambert By Lambert Strether of Corrente. In my perambulations through the biosphere, I haven’t written about animals before, so I guess writing about whole-critter biosensors is a good way to open the New Year. This article, from Bored Panda seven months ago, surfaced...

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The Top 10 Weather and Climate Events of a Record-Setting Year

By Jeff Masters, PhD, and Dana Nuccitelli, Yale Climate Connections. Originally published at Yale Climate Connections. Calendar year 2020 was an extreme and abnormal year, in so many ways. The global coronavirus pandemic altered people’s lives around the world, as did extreme weather and climate events. Let’s review the year’s top 10 such events. [embedded content] 1. Hottest Year on Record? The official rankings will not be released until January 14, but according to NASA, Earth’s average...

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Alaska Tribes, Conservation Groups, and Businesses Sue to Save the Tongass National Forest

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. In October, following Trump’s direct intervention and under pressure from Alaska state officials, the administration rescinded the ‘roadless rule’ in the Tongass National Forests, thus clearing the way to expand access of logging, mining, and other extractive industries. The Trump administration has rolled back environmental protections, from the over...

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How The Fracking Revolution Is Killing the U.S. Oil and Gas Industry

By Justin Mikulka, a freelance writer, audio and video producer living in Trumansburg, NY. Originally published at DeSmog Blog After over a decade of the much-hyped U.S. fracking miracle, the U.S. oil and gas industry is having to deal with years of losses and falling asset values which has dealt the industry a serious financial blow. This is despite the fracking revolution delivering record oil and gas production for the past decade, peaking in 2019. While the pandemic has hurt the...

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New Hope for Coral Restoration with “Electric Reefs”?

By Lambert Strether of Corrente. Last year, we looked at coral and coral restoration where “coral gardeners” painstakingly reattached live coral bits to existing, damaged reefs. (Corals are honorary plants, for anyone who wants to send me pictures.) At that time, I questioned whether it was possible to “mobilize” coral gardeners for reef restoration, and whether it was or will be possible, it hasn’t happened. In this post (inspired by a reweeted thread by Sarah Taber from Interfluidity’s...

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Why We Need to Adopt Friedrich Engels’ Thinking on Science in These Times

Yves here. One of the oddities of history is how some thinkers who are influential in their time are relegated to lesser positions over time, while others see their stature elevated. Erasmus was a best seller in his day and is still recognized as seminal. At the time of his death, Confucius was in despair that his beliefs had not gotten much of a following. By contrast, Friedrich Engels, a name often invoked with hostility, since Engels, with Marx, was notorious as a father of Communism....

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