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Tag Archives: environment

Plastics in Oceans Will Triple By 2040, Absent Immediate Drastic Action

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. The Pew Charitable Trust and  Systemiq Ltd., a sustainability consulting firm, have released a new study reporting that plastics in the world’s oceans could triple by 2040. Nearly 13 million metic tons of plastics find their way into oceans every year, or the equivalent of one garbage trunk of such waste is dumped into the sea every minute. Current...

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After IMO 2020, decarbonization in spotlight for shipping sector: Fuel for Thought

Shipping companies in Asia and around the globe are steaming ahead with efforts to minimize their carbon footprint as the urgency to decarbonize intensifies after a fairly smooth transition to the International Maritime Organization’s low-sulfur mandate for marine fuels. The IMO in April 2018 laid out its strategy to reduce the shipping industry’s total greenhouse gas emissions in 2050 by at least 50% from 2008 levels, and to reduce CO2 emissions per transport work by at least 40%...

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The Mekong River, Water Wars, and Information Wars

By Lambert Strether of Corrente I’m afraid this is a post where I did indeed catch a bird, just not the one that I intended to catch. I had thought to write a post the Mekong River part of the biosphere (as with coral, mangroves, soil, and algae in Lake Erie) but as it turned out, all the recent news on the topic was polluted by a State Department propaganda operation (pause here to give the Administration and Secretary Pompeo credit for more subtlety than they usually display). So instead of...

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Could Leaving ‘Room for the River’ Help Protect Communities from Floods?

By Samantha Harrington, who reports for Yale Climate Connections. Originally published at Yale Climate Connections. Living near the Mississippi River means keeping an eye trained on the water level. That’s something DeAnna Bell in O’Fallon, Illinois, knows all too well. Bell, who was trapped by floodwaters during the record-breaking flood of 1993, has watched again and again as water engulfed her area. In the spring of 2019, record snowmelt and heavy rain conspired to keep her region under...

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Wolf Richter: The Great American Shale Oil & Gas Massacre: Bankruptcies, Defaulted Debts, Worthless Shares, Collapsed Prices of Oil & Gas

Jerri-Lynn here. For more detail on the carnage in the oil and gas sector, see also the NY Times front page story I linked to today, Fracking Firms Fail, Rewarding Executives and Raising Climate Fears.  We’ve been tracking this bust in crossposts, and have featured the excellent series at DesmogBlog on fracking’s follies. The day of reckoning has arrived, and Wolf Richter’s post highlights the record number of bankruptcy filings in this banner year. By Wolf Richter, editor of Wolf Street....

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Federal Judge Nixes Part of Glyphosate Settlement That Would Allow a Panel of Scientific “Experts”, Rather Than Juries, to Decide Whether the Chemical is Carcinogenic for Future Claims

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Federal district court judge Vince Chhabria last Monday effectively torpedoed  a controversial part of Bayer’s proposed $10.9 billion glyphosate settlement, which he must approve – thus effectively nixing the provision.Bayer wants  a panel of specially selected scientific experts to decide whether something causes cancer or not, taking that decision...

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ESG and mining: sustainability after coronavirus

As the world battles the coronavirus pandemic and resulting economic fallout, industries of all types face the urgent challenge of securing their short-term financial future. But the debate about environmental, social and governance concerns has been far from drowned out by the global health crisis, even taking on new meaning as companies’ responsibilities toward worker and community health came to the fore. For the mining sector, ESG was undoubtedly a business buzzword in 2019, but its main...

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2020’s Plague of Locusts Spreads to Indian Subcontinent and South America

By Lambert Strether of Corrente. I thought I’d lighten up the mood by posting on a plague that’s actually visible: locusts (here is a photo essay in The Atlantic. See also previous NC posts in February and March. Wikipedia has a country round-up). Since the locust swarms of East Africa are already well-covered (“Crunch, crunch: Africa’s locust outbreak is far from over“), I’ll look at the Indian subcontinent (Nepal, Pakistan, India) and Latin America (Argentina, Brazil). To review, locusts...

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Some New Climate Models Are Projecting Extreme Warming. Are They Correct?

Yves here. Readers may be surprised to learn that independent science groups review major climate models on a regular basis. Nevertheless, and I hate to seem like such a naysayer, but between Covid-19 and greater social divisions, the ability of many advanced economies to change course on climate change seems very much diminished. By Jeff Berardelli, a meteorologist and climate contributor to CBS News in New York City, and a regular contributor to Yale Climate Connections. Originally...

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Waste Watch: Plastic Free July in the Age of COVID-19

Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. Three years ago more or less, I first became aware of and wrote about Plastic Free July in this post, Plastic Free July: What YOU Can Do to Reduce Plastics Waste. Since that time, lots has happened – especially in the last several months- as we all are well aware. Yet the plastic problem has if anything worsened, as we all try to dodge COVID-19 . Some...

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