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Tag Archives: Doomsday scenarios

Take the Train: France Moves to Ban Short-Haul Domestic Flights

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans. The French National Assembly voted to ban short-haul domestic flights on routes where the train journey takes less than two and a half hours. Connecting services are not affected. Reuters reported: The measure is part of a broader climate bill that aims to cut French carbon emissions by 40% in 2030 from 1990 levels, though activists accuse President...

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How China Is Offering an Alternative to the IMF

Yves here. This post makes an important follow-on to Michael Hudson’s discussion of how China and America are pursuing markedly differing economic strategies. While the IMF is extremely unpopular in Asia due to its heavy-handed management of the late 1990s currency crises, it’s not clear that China can yet step in. The reason that dollar swap lines are valuable is that most trade transactions are denominated in dollars. Any bank that aspires to be an international bank has to be able to clear...

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Experts Lay Out Their Case Against Carbon Pricing

Yves here. This article takes a look at how little progress is being made against climate/carbon emission targets and recommends more aggressive government action. Presumably the book it’s summarizing, Making Climate Policy Work. However, it sets up a straw man by equating carbon pricing with cap and trade and carbon offsets. We’ve called out those approaches starting with the early days of this website, in 2007, as gimmicks that enrich intermediaries, are rife with fraud, fail to change...

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Slaughter Central: The United States as a Mass-Killing Machine

Yves here. Tom Engelhardt tries to get his arms around US weapons sales and use. The figures are depressing, particularly in comparison to those of our nominal peers. And the intensity of our fixation with killing has only grown only over time. Just look at TV. In its early, tamer days, frontier shows like The Rifleman and Gunsmoke gave weapons top billing. Now in our post-Vietnam, post Archie Bunker of greater realism, police shows have gory gunplay as their prime offering, with big side...

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Life in a Remote Alaskan Community on the Front Line of Climate Change

By Connor Dunleavy,Yale Climate Connections. Originally published at Yale Climate Connections. WHITTIER, ALASKA – The world’s high-latitude regions experience climate change at a rate twice as fast as the rest of the world. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Prince Williams Sound in South Central Alaska. This shelter body of water off the North Pacific is home to some of the tallest coastal mountains in the world and dominated by glaciers and icefields. But with the extreme warming and...

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Christian Nationalism Is a Barrier to Mass Vaccination Against COVID-19

Yves here. I’m running this post with its original headline, although the article doesn’t make terribly clear what “Christian nationalism” is. The author defines is at extreme evangelism but I’m at a loss to understand what makes that “nationalism”. The reason I am running this article is that it discusses an specific issue that IM Doc mentioned back in early February. And even though we are discussing different subcultures in America, we might as well be talking about different countries....

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China and US: Stumbling into War?

Yves here. While the general thesis, that opposed interests, rising hostility, lack of negotiating inclination/skills, mutual misunderstanding, and aggressive gestures being believed to be popular at home could too easily lead to an otherwise not intended war, is sensible, I’m not sure I agree with Klare’s take on Taiwan. He acknowledges that “Both sides recognize that such contradictory impulses are only likely to be resolved through armed conflict” yet argues that neither side wants war but...

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Getting a Prescription to Die Remains Tricky Even as Aid-in-Dying Bills Gain Momentum

Yves here. “Right to die” is a product of Christian prohibitions against suicide. After all, none of us gets out of here alive. However, the issue of pain or severe debility among the old and not necessarily so old is seldom discussed in polite company. My father shot himself when he could no longer endure the horrific symptoms of an autoimmune disease that was always fatal. One of my parents’ friends had successfully fought off breast cancer a couple of times. When it recurred and she was...

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Our Collective Long Covid

We hate to play our regular role of being the (early) bearer of bad tidings. For some time, we’ve been pointing to information and developments that suggest that efforts to contain Covid are having only limited success. That means Covid will be with us a very long time. Yet there’s still a tremendous amount of wishful thinking and denial which has the potential to make this bad situation worse. Ambrit’s take yesterday: “The Pandemic is not even slowing down, yet, a false sense of triumphalism...

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Utopian Socialism Brings About Toilet Paper Shortages Maybe In The Near Future, or A Short Ideological History of the Suez Canal

Yves here. Aside from the real and possibly growing consequences of the monster ship still stuck in the Suez Canal (you can verify here), it has also provided comic relief. And now education! BTW I asked Lambert about the Evergreen/Ever Given business. The name of the line is Evergreen. Individual ship have names like Ever Given, Ever Willing [not!]…. By Barkley Rosser, Professor of Economics at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. Originally published at EconoSpeak Yeah, to...

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