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Tag Archives: CEPR Blog

SEC Chief Accountant’s Trip(s) through the Revolving Door are Emblematic of a Broader Problem

In May, Wesley Bricker, the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Chief Accountant, announced that he was stepping down. Early last month, we learned where he had landed: PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), one of the “Big Four” auditors, as Vice Chair and Assurance Leader for the US and Mexico. With this move, Bricker has completed his fourth turn through the revolving door between PwC and the SEC. Although seemingly remarkable, his career trajectory is emblematic of the nearly...

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Trump’s Contempt for Working-Class Expressed in New Expanded Public Charge Rule

  This week the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officially published regulations that radically expand the definition of an archaic immigration law term, public charge, to include various non-cash benefits that supplement earnings and other income, but are impossible to live on in the absence of other income. The people most impacted include millions of working-class and middle-class US citizens who plan to marry or are married to foreign nationals.Read More ...

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Social Security Does Much More for Disadvantaged Children than Temporary Assistance

  With both Social Security and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) having anniversaries this month — August 14, 1935 and August 22, 1996, respectively — it’s a good time to compare and contrast what they do for children and youth. If you listen to Social Security’s critics, it’s easy to come away thinking that Social Security is a system of generational theft in which Boomer parents and grandparents steal from their children and grandchildren. At the same time, many of these...

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US-China Trade War Shifts Focus to Currency

For the moment, the US trade war with China has shifted focus from stealing US intellectual property back to the value of its currency, with the Trump administration renewing its old charge of manipulation — deliberately devaluing its currency to give its products an advantage in international trade.  Dean Baker has written several recent articles on US-China trade and why the value of China’s currency matters. This seems like a good time to revisit some important points Baker makes on...

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July Update on the State of Independent Federal Agencies

As we have previously highlighted, the federal government’s forty independent federal agencies receive too little attention relative to their importance to our collective safety and prosperity. The Revolving Door Project has worked through multiple channels to shed light on these overlooked agencies and the threats that they face. We hope public education will generate pressure to safeguard the independence of these agencies and ensure that they are staffed with advocates for the public...

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Revolving Door Project Requests Info On Big Tech Regulators

The Revolving Door Project’s mission is to scrutinize the nexus of corporate power and the executive branch. In the United States, two agencies within the executive branch have the power to seek to break up a company: The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Antitrust Division. That is why it is important that we research any entanglements undermining the FTC and DOJ Antitrust’s commitment to serving the public interest. For decades, these agencies have...

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Labor Market Policy Research Reports, June 2019

CEPR regularly publishes a curated collection of original research from academic institutions and nonprofits on the state of the US labor market. The compilation is part of our ongoing effort to promote informed debate on the most important economic and social issues that affect people's lives. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) Policy Basics: How Many Weeks of Unemployment Compensation Are Available?  The federal-state unemployment insurance system provides temporary...

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Private Equity in Higher Education: A Full Ride at Student and Taxpayer Expense?

This May, millions of new graduates found themselves torn between triumph and trepidation, as looming obligations to begin repaying student loans tempered celebrations nationwide. Still others had no cause to celebrate, having accrued debt without obtaining their desired degree or certification. Many of those in the latter group attended a for-profit college or university; students at these schools tend to accumulate more educational debt, and make up a disproportionate share of indebted...

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June Update on the State of Independent Federal Agencies

As we have previously highlighted, the federal government’s forty independent federal agencies receive too little attention relative to their importance to our collective safety and prosperity. The Revolving Door Project has worked through multiple channels to shed light on these overlooked agencies and the threats that they face. We hope public education will generate pressure to safeguard the independence of these agencies and ensure that they are staffed with advocates for the public...

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Hours of Work No Longer Declining and the Climate May Pay the Price

As countries develop, they face a choice: cash in on productivity gains as increased income or to enjoy increased leisure. That leisure means not only shorter workdays or a shorter workweek, but also longer vacations, more paid holidays, paid family and medical leave, and other time off. Choosing the latter, reducing annual work hours, is better for the climate than favoring long work hours and a high-consumption economy. Over the last 36 years, productivity, measured by Gross National...

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