Thursday , April 2 2020
Home / Tag Archives: bond yields

Tag Archives: bond yields

(Almost) Everything Sold Off Today

The eurodollar curve’s latest twist exposes what’s behind the long end. To recap: big down day in stocks which, for the first time in a while, wasn’t accompanied by massive buying in longer maturity UST’s. Instead, these were sold, too. Rumors of parity funds liquidating were all over the place, which is consistent with this curve behavior. Let’s start with eurodollar futures; the curve had absolutely collapsed up to Monday. It was remarkable even though not unexpected. We haven’t seen this...

Read More »

The Greenspan Moon Cult

Taking another look at what I wrote about repo and the latest developments yesterday, it may be worthwhile to spend some additional time on the “why” as it pertains to so much determined official blindness, an unshakeable devotion to otherwise easily explained lunar events. The short version: monetary authorities as well as the “experts” describe almost perfectly risk averse behavior among the central money dealing system in outbreaks like September’s repo – but then bend over backward...

Read More »

Zombie Insurance, Or Not

It’s another example of the difficulties in trying to evaluate and analyze non-economic factors. China’s virus outbreak is a nightmare for those unfortunately living through it, and Chinese officials aren’t doing themselves any favors. Trust is a sketchy enough concept. The WHO today says there is no pandemic, which, as Erik Townsend of MacroVoices points out, immediately puts this announcement at odds with the official WHO definition of one. Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus...

Read More »

Was It A Midpoint And Did We Already Pass Through It?

We certainly don’t have a crystal ball at the ready, and we can’t predict the future. The best we might hope is to entertain reasonable probabilities for it oftentimes derived from how we see the past. Which is just what statistics and econometrics attempt. Except, wherein they go wrong we don’t have to make their mistakes. For example, in the Fed’s main model ferbus there’s no way to input a global dollar shortage. Even if there was, to this statistical construction it would be erased by the...

Read More »

FX, Repo, And Another ‘Strong’ Labor Market

Between the summer of 2011 and February 2012, the unemployment rate experienced its largest half-year drop since the huge recovery that had been taking place in 1984. It was a very welcome sign that the US economy may have avoided becoming entangled in the global funding messes of 2011. Caught flat-footed, as always, Ben Bernanke’s Fed had ended QE2 at the end of June that year on what was believed to be a high note only to begin anew with Operation Twist not even three months later. Those...

Read More »

Manufacturing Clears Up Bond Yields

Yesterday, IHS Markit reported that the manufacturing turnaround its data has been suggesting stalled. After its flash manufacturing PMI had fallen below 50 several times during last summer (only to be revised to slightly above 50 every time the complete survey results were tabulated), beginning in September 2019 the index staged a rebound jumping first to 51.1 in that month. Subsequent months of data had continued the trend. By November, the PMI registered 52.6 and solidly on the upswing....

Read More »

The 2019 Tailwinds of Housing Describe the 2020 Headwinds of Economy

It’s all somewhat confusing, once acclimated to this new paradigm. The highest in years can still be nearer the lowest in history. Given that apparent contradiction, it seems as if only one of those perspectives can apply. Which one you focus on often depends upon which way you already lean. Toward the end of last year, mortgage interest rates had climbed up near 5% (average 30-year). It was the highest since early 2011, a surefire calamity for the housing market. And that market was under...

Read More »

The Financial Midpoint Comes Into Focus

Another dovish example to be put on the growing pile of good things? The People’s Bank of China (PBOC) earlier today trimmed one of its many policy rates. The 7-day reverse repo rate will be reduced from 2.55% to 2.50%, a 5 bps cut practically pointless in functional terms widely interpreted instead for its purported “meaning.” Like the Fed, the Chinese central bank, we are being told, is finally coming around to more and more “stimulus.” Even if it is, is that really a good thing? In truth,...

Read More »

Three (Rate Cuts) And GDP, Where (How) Does It End?

The Federal Reserve has indicated that it will now pause – for a second time, supposedly. Remember the first: after raising its benchmark rates apparatus in December while still talking about an inflationary growth acceleration requiring even more hikes throughout 2019, in a matter of weeks that was transformed into a temporary suspension of them. Expecting the easy disappearance of “transitory” factors, that Fed pause was to be followed by the second half rebound and eventual if careful...

Read More »

Monthly Macro Monitor: Market Indicators Review

Is the recession scare over? Can we all come out from under our desks now? The market based economic indicators I follow have improved since my last update two months ago. The 10-year Treasury rate has moved 40 basis points off its low. Real interest rates have moved up as well but not quite as much. The difference is reflected in slightly higher inflation expectations. The yield curve has also steepened as the 10-year Treasury yield rose faster than the 2-year. This is not the type of...

Read More »