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Tag Archives: bank reserves

The Great Eurodollar Famine: The Pendulum of Money Creation Combined With Intermediation

It was one of those signals which mattered more than the seemingly trivial details surrounding the affair. The name MF Global doesn’t mean very much these days, but for a time in late 2011 it came to represent outright fear. Some were even declaring it the next “Lehman.” While the “bank” did eventually fail, and the implications of it came to be systemic, those overly melodramatic descriptions actually served to downplay the event in public imagination. The world didn’t outwardly fall apart...

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Until This Changes, Forget Inflation: Banks Bought Epic Amounts of Safe, Liquid Assets in H1 ’21

The first half of 2021 was inundated with government helicopters, more QE’s, and then CPI’s put up with guarantees the “inflation” was going to continue for a long time. Jamie Dimon, JP Morgan’s often hapless CEO, proudly declared US Treasuries beyond the touch of any 10-foot pole. With the economy on fire, he “reasoned”, who would ever want safe and liquid instruments?The Federal Reserve, ironically, since Mr. Dimon is always on the Fed’s side, provides us with a more than partial answer....

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The Consequences of What You Don’t See

Because it’s what you don’t see that ultimately matters, the public is left entirely in the dark unable to join what really should be easy dots to connect. Something is wrong, and pretty much everyone acknowledges this if in their own way. We can see the social and political disintegration before our very eyes, the anger, the “revolution”, even the increasing fragmentation as a world once buoyed by globalization turns diametrically against it. We are constantly told to expect growth and...

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Tapering Or Calibrating, The Lady’s Not Inflating

We’ve got one central bank over here in America which appears as if its members can’t wait to “taper”, bringing up both the topic and using that particular word as much as possible. Jay Powell’s Federal Reserve obviously intends to buoy confidence by projecting as much when it does cut back on the pace of its (irrelevant) QE6. On the other side of the Atlantic, Europe’s central bank will be technically be doing the same thing likely at the same time. Except, Christine Lagarde said early...

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Chip Shortages, Crude Boiling, Fed Explosion And…No Inflation

An integrated circuit (IC) is a set of electronic circuits put together on one small, flat semiconductor medium. We call this thing a chip, and it is essential for so much of what we do in the modern computerized, digital world. Manufacturers can’t even produce cars without them.It stands to reason, then, that any shortfall or hitch in the availability of IC’s could be a huge economic problem with systemic implications. Thus, when some trade magazine which is closely following the physical...

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Previewing The Taper Theater

Eurodollar, not Evergrande. That wasn’t just the point of yesterday’s recall, it is the whole point of beyond fourteen years of going only the wrong way. The deflationary way. Defaults in China are nowadays a commonplace part of that trend, one which began early in 2014 with Shanghai Chaori Solar.What was significant about Chaori was this: “It was the moment when the eurodollar finally caught up to China.” You can literally see it. The problem is despite the deficiency being just this...

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Honestly Not Easy

Central banking’s real monetary power comes from a different kind of printing. We’re all taught and told from the very beginning that it’s derived from enjoying the money printer, the ability to stack currency at will. No. In actual fact, monetary policies are all money-less leaving “monetary” authorities to employ instead the press which prints words.Deciding which words, and more importantly what they mean, now that’s not at all what they teach you in school. The closest to this...

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Finally, QuEstioning ‘Easy Money’

A fascinating and useful bit of economic research was put forward just last month by Britain’s House of Lords (and thanks to Greg for digging it up). That body’s Economic Affairs Committee heard detailed testimony on the subject of Quantitative Easing, commonly known as QE. From the title of the report prepared in advance of the witnesses presenting their opinions and findings (QE: A Dangerous Addiction) you already know they’ve come to the right conclusions if launching from the wrong,...

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Neither Coincidence Nor Nothing: Fedwire Six Months Later

It was one of those little things that really shouldn’t have made any difference whatsoever, an interesting if trivial little nugget left behind for only obsessive scholars to care any about. Late in the morning of February 24, 2021, Fedwire shutdown. The fact a couple hours inactive snowballed into something bigger, we wondered if this would end up being indicative of how it might turn the world’s economic direction and then turn out.Now six months later, we can quite confidently make our...

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CPI’s At Fives Yet Treasury Auctions

A momentous day, for sure, but one lost in what would turn out to be a seemingly endless sea of them. October 8, 2008, right in the thick of the world’s first global financial crisis (how could it have been global, surely not subprime mortgages?) the Federal Reserve took center stage; or tried to. Having bungled Lehman, botched AIG, and then surrendered to Treasury which then screwed up TARP, the world’s entire financial edifice was burning down while US policymakers (they aren’t central...

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