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The Weekend Zeitgeist – 5.18.2019

Summary:
Every morning, we run the Narrative Machine on the past 24 hours worth of financial media to find the most on-narrative (i.e. interconnected and central) stories. On the weekend, we leave finance to cover the last week or so in other shifting parts of the Zeitgeist – namely, politics and culture. It’s not a list of best articles or articles we think are most interesting … often far from it. But these are articles that have struck a chord in narrative world.  May 18, 2019 Narrative Map – Non-Financial Articles Source: Quid, Epsilon Theory There isn’t much to be said about this, except how depressing it is that articles about anti-Semitism are still among the most-connected to broader narratives in news in 2019. The iconoclasm debate is back on the menu, and the

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Every morning, we run the Narrative Machine on the past 24 hours worth of financial media to find the most on-narrative (i.e. interconnected and central) stories. On the weekend, we leave finance to cover the last week or so in other shifting parts of the Zeitgeist – namely, politics and culture. It’s not a list of best articles or articles we think are most interesting … often far from it.

But these are articles that have struck a chord in narrative world. 


May 18, 2019 Narrative Map – Non-Financial Articles

The Weekend Zeitgeist – 5.18.2019
Source: Quid, Epsilon Theory

There isn’t much to be said about this, except how depressing it is that articles about anti-Semitism are still among the most-connected to broader narratives in news in 2019.


The iconoclasm debate is back on the menu, and the kind of language used by each political pole on this topic is fairly well-established at this point. That means that a story or two, an editorial like this and coverage of Mayor Buttigieg stating his willingness to consider removing art celebrating Thomas Jefferson are enough to bring this back to the front-and-center.

It is a topic that emerges because it is so naturally virulent, and so little subject to mind-changing that the act of bringing it back into the public consciousness seems almost certainly a sign of intent to expand the widening gyre. This ranting opinion article is exactly of that ilk, intended to convince no one of anything, other than to convince anyone right of center to “get mad.” Everyone has abstracted the monuments into whatever issue matters to them, argues on that basis, and all the angry ships from both sides pass in the night.

If the article you’re reading about includes monuments to Jefferson or Washington, consider this a GTC instruction to ask “Why am I reading this NOW?”


The Weekend Zeitgeist – 5.18.2019

The article is wonkish, of course. It’s the V&E blog, after all.

But the language of gig economy businesses, wages, and the powerful and rising influence of technology companies on our lives and livelihoods, are all highly connected parts of the Zeitgeist. I think it is likely they will be connected to our upcoming election cycle as well.


The Weekend Zeitgeist – 5.18.2019

As we will argue when we launch our ET Election Index in the coming days, while Biden is polling extremely well, the language used in discussions about Biden is among the least connected of any candidate to the narratives and core issues of the campaign. There is plenty of time for that to change, of course, but for now we there’s a meaningful chance that either his dominance begins to fade or his policy platform is forced to move leftward.


The Weekend Zeitgeist – 5.18.2019
  1. God bless the person who wrote this sentence.
  2. God bless FOIA.
  3. God bless the Navy.

The Weekend Zeitgeist – 5.18.2019

Hedonic adjustments, even in death. Yes, funerals may cost upwards of $10,000, but you really must consider the quality and craftsmanship of this beautiful mahogany-paneled casket before you assert inflation against a shallow rock-lined pit.

Rusty Guinn
Executive Vice President of Asset Management, Salient. Rusty Guinn is the executive vice president of asset management at Salient. He oversees Salient’s retail and institutional asset management business, including investment teams, products, and strategy. Rusty shares his perspective and experience as an investor on the Epsilon Theory website.

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