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22/3/20: COVID2019 in Numbers

Summary:
Updating numbers for Corona Virus infections and related deaths: Next up, comparing Italy and U.S. numbers in terms of their dynamics from the start of the infection detections in each country (date 30) to today: Note, while the U.S. infections dynamics have overtaken Italy already, U.S. death rates remain well below those in Italy. This is due to a range of factors, none of which are particularly satisfactory for the U.S. healthcare system assessment:Italian demographics and deaths cases suggest that Italian patients were more likely to die from the disease earlier on after the detection than the U.S. patients. Higher population density and concentration of the virus cases in Italy mean greater strain on healthcare resources in specific locations in Italy than in the U.S. rates of

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Updating numbers for Corona Virus infections and related deaths:
22/3/20: COVID2019 in Numbers

Next up, comparing Italy and U.S. numbers in terms of their dynamics from the start of the infection detections in each country (date 30) to today:
22/3/20: COVID2019 in Numbers

Note, while the U.S. infections dynamics have overtaken Italy already, U.S. death rates remain well below those in Italy. This is due to a range of factors, none of which are particularly satisfactory for the U.S. healthcare system assessment:

  1. Italian demographics and deaths cases suggest that Italian patients were more likely to die from the disease earlier on after the detection than the U.S. patients.
  2. Higher population density and concentration of the virus cases in Italy mean greater strain on healthcare resources in specific locations in Italy than in the U.S.
  3. rates of detection and treatment are most likely much higher in Italy than in the U.S. due to more severe restrictions in the U.S. in accessing healthcare. 
I covered some of these earlier here: https://trueeconomics.blogspot.com/2020/03/15320-acute-beds-and-hospital-beds.html. But here is an added kicker not mentioned in the linked post: the U.S. is now facing a massive wave of ongoing layoffs. As workers lose their jobs, they also lose access to health insurance (the continuity coverage program, COBRA, is excruciatingly expensive).

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