Thursday , April 9 2020
Home / Constantin Gurdgiev: True Economics / 18/2/20: Irish Statistics: Fake News and Housing Markets

18/2/20: Irish Statistics: Fake News and Housing Markets

Summary:
My latest column for The Currency covers the less-public stats behind the Irish housing markets: https://www.thecurrency.news/articles/9754/fake-news-you-cant-fool-all-of-the-people-all-of-the-time-on-property-statistics. Key takeaways: "Irish voters cast a protest vote against the parties that led the government over the last eight years – a vote that just might be divorced from ideological preferences for overarching policy philosophy.""The drivers of this protest vote have been predominantly based on voters’ understanding of the socio-economic reality that is totally at odds with the official statistics. In a way, Irish voters have chosen not to trust the so-called fake data coming out of the mainstream, pro-government analysis and media. The fact that this has happened during the

Topics:
[email protected] (TrueEconomics) considers the following as important: , , , , , , , , ,

This could be interesting, too:

Gregor Samsa writes It’s Truly Going To Be Different This Time

[email protected] (TrueEconomics) writes 2/4/20: COVID19 in three charts

Lance Roberts writes Previous Employment Concerns Becoming An Ugly Reality

Mike Shedlock writes Shedlock: Recession Will Be Deeper Than The Great Financial Crisis


My latest column for The Currency covers the less-public stats behind the Irish housing markets: https://www.thecurrency.news/articles/9754/fake-news-you-cant-fool-all-of-the-people-all-of-the-time-on-property-statistics.

18/2/20: Irish Statistics: Fake News and Housing Markets
Key takeaways:
"Irish voters cast a protest vote against the parties that led the government over the last eight years – a vote that just might be divorced from ideological preferences for overarching policy philosophy."

"The drivers of this protest vote have been predominantly based on voters’ understanding of the socio-economic reality that is totally at odds with the official statistics. In a way, Irish voters have chosen not to trust the so-called fake data coming out of the mainstream, pro-government analysis and media. The fact that this has happened during the time when the Irish economy is commonly presented as being in rude health, with low unemployment, rapid headline growth figures and healthy demographics is not the bug, but a central feature of Ireland’s political system."

Stay tuned for subsequent analysis of other economic statistics for Ireland in the next article.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *