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Why Has the Share of US Prime-Age Women in the Labor Force Fallen Behind Other Economies?

Summary:
In 1990, nearly three-quarters (74.0 percent) of prime-age women, ages 25 to 54, in the US participated in the labor force. Only the Nordic countries — Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland — had substantially higher shares of women in the labor force, while women’s labor force participation in Canada was modestly higher at 75.5 percent. ...

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In 1990, nearly three-quarters (74.0 percent) of prime-age women, ages 25 to 54, in the US participated in the labor force. Only the Nordic countries — Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland — had substantially higher shares of women in the labor force, while women’s labor force participation in Canada was modestly higher at 75.5 percent. The US ranked sixth out of 22 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries.

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