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Healthcare Wages Stagnant 2005–2015 for All Gender and Race/Ethnicity Groups

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This is the second in a series of blog posts based on the CEPR report, Organizational Restructuring in U.S. Healthcare Systems: Implications for Jobs, Wages, and Inequality, that examines the experiences of healthcare workers over a decade of change from 2005 to 2015. Examining wage trends in hospitals by gender and race/ethnicity we observe that ...

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This is the second in a series of blog posts based on the CEPR report, Organizational Restructuring in U.S. Healthcare Systems: Implications for Jobs, Wages, and Inequality, that examines the experiences of healthcare workers over a decade of change from 2005 to 2015.

Examining wage trends in hospitals by gender and race/ethnicity we observe that the real median hourly wage of full-time, full-year workers increased for every demographic group over the decade. However, with the exception of white women and Asian/other women, the real wage increases came to less than one dollar an hour. White women’s real median wage increased by $1.24 between 2005 and 2015, Asian/other women saw an increase of $1.50 over that time period.

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Eileen Appelbaum
Co-Director, CEPR and Visiting Professor, Leicester University UK Co-author of 'Private Equity at Work' & 'Unfinished Business'

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