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Personal Consumption Expenditures by State, 2016

Summary:
State personal consumption expenditures (PCE) grew on average 4.0 percent in 2016, the same rate as in 2015 (table 1), according to statistics released today by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In 2016, PCE growth ranged from 0.2 percent in North Dakota to 6.2 percent in Utah. After Utah, the states with the fastest growth in PCE were Colorado, Hawaii, and Idaho. Utah and Colorado were also among the fastest growing states in 2015. After North Dakota, the states with the slowest PCE growth were Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Alaska. Category growth in PCE by state. In 2016, growth in housing and utilities and in health care were the leading contributors to national PCE growth (table 3). These categories grew 4.3 percent

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State personal consumption expenditures (PCE) grew on average 4.0 percent in 2016, the same rate as in 2015 (table 1), according to statistics released today by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In 2016, PCE growth ranged from 0.2 percent in North Dakota to 6.2 percent in Utah.

After Utah, the states with the fastest growth in PCE were Colorado, Hawaii, and Idaho. Utah and Colorado were also among the fastest growing states in 2015. After North Dakota, the states with the slowest PCE growth were Wyoming, Oklahoma, and Alaska.

Personal Consumption Expenditures by State, 2016

Category growth in PCE by state. In 2016, growth in housing and utilities and in health care were the leading contributors to national PCE growth (table 3). These categories grew 4.3 percent and 5.0 percent, respectively (table 2). Spending on housing and utilities and health care were also the leading contributors to PCE growth in most states, including the four fastest growing states.

  • Utah and Colorado experienced above average growth in housing and utilities expenditures at 5.0 percent and 5.6 percent, respectively.
  • Utah, Colorado, Hawaii, and Idaho experienced above average growth in health care expenditures at 9.6 percent, 6.7 percent, 7.5 percent, and 7.8 percent, respectively.

Gasoline and other energy goods was the only category that subtracted from national PCE growth. Expenditures on gasoline and other energy goods declined on average 10.3 percent. Spending on gasoline and other energy goods declined in every state and subtracted the most from growth among the slowest growing states. North Dakota, Wyoming, and Alaska experienced larger than average declines in this expenditure category, 22.1 percent, 14.8 percent, and 12.6 percent, respectively.

Per capita PCE by state in 2016. Across all states and the District of Columbia, per capita PCE was $39,664 (table 4). Per capita PCE by state ranged from a high of $51,981 in Massachusetts to a low of $30,200 in Mississippi. Per capita PCE in the District of Columbia was $56,843.

Personal Consumption Expenditures by State, 2016
  • After Massachusetts, the states with the highest per capita PCE were Alaska, New Jersey, and New Hampshire. After Mississippi, the states with the lowest per capita PCE were Arkansas, Alabama, and Oklahoma.
  • Massachusetts, Alaska, New Jersey, and New Hampshire had above average per capita spending on housing and utilities, health care, and food and beverages purchased for off-premises consumption. Alaska and New Hampshire also had above average per capita spending on gasoline and other energy goods.
  • Mississippi, Arkansas, Alabama, and Oklahoma were among the states with the lowest per capita spending on housing and utilities and food and beverages purchased for off-premises consumption. These states also had below average per capita spending on health care, but above average per capita spending on gasoline and other energy goods.

More information on per capita spending for these categories can be found in the supplemental maps that accompany this release.

Updates to Personal Consumption Expenditures by State. Today, BEA also released revised annual estimates of personal consumption expenditures by state for 2014 and 2015. Updates were made to incorporate the results of the 2017 annual update of the national income and product accounts and newly available and revised state source data.

Next release: October 4, 2018 – Personal Consumption Expenditures by State, 2017.

Additional Information

Resources

Definitions

PCE by state is the state counterpart of the Nation's personal consumption expenditures (PCE). PCE by state measures the goods and services purchased by or on behalf of households and the net expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households (NPISHs) by state of residence for the 50 states and the District of Columbia. PCE by state reflects spending on activities that are attributable to the residents of a state, even when those activities take place outside of the state.

Per capita PCE by state measures average PCE spending per person in a state and it is calculated as PCE in a state divided by the population of the state.

Current-dollar PCE by state statistics are unadjusted for price changes and reflect variation in both prices and quantities.

Statistical Conventions

Year-to-year percent changes are calculated from unrounded data.

BEA Regions

BEA groups all 50 states and the District of Columbia into eight distinct regions for purposes of presentation and analysis.
New England (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont) Mideast (Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania) Great Lakes (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin) Plains (Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota) Southeast (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia) Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) Rocky Mountain (Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Utah, and Wyoming) Far West (Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington)

Relationship of PCE by state to national PCE. The U.S. PCE by state differs slightly from the PCE in the national accounts because PCE by state excludes the net expenditures abroad by U.S. residents, which consist of government and private employees' expenditures abroad less personal remittances in kind to nonresidents. PCE by state, however, does include the travel expenditures abroad by U.S. residents.

List of News Release Tables

Table 1. Total Personal Consumption Expenditures by State

Table 2. Percent Change from Preceding Period of Personal Consumption Expenditures by Category and State

Table 3. Category Contributions to Percent Change in Total Personal Consumption Expenditures by State

Table 4. Per Capita Personal Consumption Expenditures by State for Select Categories

Bureau of Economic Analysis

The BEA Advisory Committee advises the Director of BEA on matters related to the development and improvement of BEA’s national, regional, industry, and international economic accounts, especially in areas of new and rapidly growing economic activities arising from innovative and advancing technologies, and provides recommendations from the perspectives of the economics profession, business, and government.

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