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Jerri-Lynn Scofield



Articles by Jerri-Lynn Scofield

Alabama to Get New Marine Sanctuary?

2 days ago

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
The steady drip drip of  news about the damage global warming is doing to marine environments, especially their corals, is bleak and depressing to this keen diver. I’m glad I saw the Great Barrier Reef before the latest rounds of warming – both under and above the water it’s a heart stopping spectacle.
I once spent about a month hanging out in Cooktown, in a part of Queensland that saw many Australian tourists, but attracted few foreign ones. In 1770, Captain Cook beached his bark, the HMS Endeavour, there and then had to figure out how to repair the damage the Great Barrier Reef had done to its hull.
One day I climbed to the top of the tallest

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Links 1/25/2021

2 days ago

40 Times Designers Forgot Things Need To Be Cleaned When Creating Them, As Shared On This Facebook Group Bored Panda
What happens to the brain on sudden impact? Egg yolks could hold the answer Ars Technica
US technological leadership is fragile Asia Times
Tech is having a reckoning. Tech investors? Not so much. MIT Technology Review
Dry January is moist for some at the rocky start of 2021 AP
English and Scottish get drunk most often, 25-nation survey finds Guardian
#COVID-19
Covid-19 vaccine tracker: the global race to vaccinate FT
Covid-19: White House criticises ‘chaotic’ vaccine rollout BBC
‘The Basic Problem Is a Lack of Central Strategy’ FAIR

WaPo: “The accelerating speed of the program undercuts assertions by some Biden advisers that they were left no plan by the Trump

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Wolf Richter: Historic Mania in SPACs, IPOs. Huge Fees for Wall Street Banks. Mega Paydays for Insiders. Disdain for Valuations. Blind Faith that “This Time It’s Different”

2 days ago

By Wolf Richter, editor of Wolf Street. Originally published at Wolf Street.
The business of SPACs is setting stunning records. A SPAC (special-purpose acquisition company) is a “blank-check company” with no business activity that raises funds from investors via an IPO and will then attempt to use those funds to buy a startup company. For the startup company, getting acquired by a SPAC is an alternative to an IPO. There are fewer disclosures to make, compared to a standard IPO. For Wall Street, there are huge fees to be made. And insiders, including those that start the SPACs, make tons of money. So all the building blocks are in place.
In 2020, an all-time record of $83 billion were raised by SPACs, six times as much as in 2019 ($13.6 billion), according to SPAC Insider’s data. This $83

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Say It Ain’t So, Joe: Character Clause May Bar Any Candidate from Election to Baseball Hall of Fame This Year

2 days ago

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
The WSJ reports today that the membership of baseball’s Hall of Fame has shrunk over the last year in Baseball’s Hall of Fame Vote Becomes a Test of ‘Character Clause’, with seven members dying in 2020 and three more thus far in 2021.
The results of the latest balloting by Baseball Writers’ Association of America will be announced this week. Yet few, if any, retired baseball players are expected to make the cut, not because they lack the career performance – as reflected in statistics – that would have in the past led to their induction into the Hall of Fame. Yet being welcomed into that elite company is way tougher than making it into the show –

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Links 1/24/2021

3 days ago

Medicine Is Made for Men New York Review of Books
Jim Haynes: A man who invited the world over for dinner BBC
Yosemite closed after high winds bring down two giant sequoias Guardian
NYC man chooses to go to jail rather than give dog back to his employer NY Post
10 Best Herbs to Grow Indoors TreeHugger
Harvard’s top astronomer says our solar system may be teeming with alien technology New Statesman
The new mosquito bringing disease to North America BBC
The Limits of Caste London Review of Books
Hank Aaron Was More Than a Man Who Hit Home Runs Jacobin
From white gold to white elephant TLS
America Has a GPS Problem NYT
The True Story of Indonesia’s US-Backed Anti-Communist Bloodbath Jacobin
#COVID-19
Rogue antibodies could be driving severe COVID-19 Nature
Can We Stop a Super Coronavirus? Der

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Rights Advocates Alarmed by US Spy Agency’s Purchase of Warrantless Phone Location Data

3 days ago

By Brett Wilkins, staff writer at Common Dreams. Originally published at CommonDreams
Digital rights advocates reacted with alarm to a report published Friday detailing how Defense Intelligence Agency analysts in recent years bought databases of U.S. smartphone location data without first obtaining warrants.
The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) is part of the Department of Defense and is tasked with informing military and civilian policymakers about the activities and intentions of foreign governments and nonstate actors.
The new revelation, first reported by the New York Times, initially came in the form of DIA responses to questions from Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) regarding the agency’s warrantless purchase of commercial location data generated by phones both inside and outside of the

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Right to Repair: Saves Consumers Money, Promotes Local Jobs Rather than Global Supply Chains

13 days ago

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
The pandemic has caused people to spend more time in their homes, inflicting greater wear and tear on their electronics and other household appliances.
In previous right to repair posts, I’ve stressed the environmental benefits that follow both from reducing elections waste, as well as not producing unnecessary items in the first place.
When devices wear down, consumers are now faced with the choice of replacing them, or repairing them – if a repair service can be found, to make the repair at a reasonable price.
U.S. Public Interest Research Group (US PIRG), which spearheads a right to repair campaign, earlier this month released a report, Repair

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Links 1/14/2021

13 days ago

What can corporations do to help save the ocean? Al Jazeera
Dire wolves went extinct 13,000 years ago but thanks to new genetic analysis their true story can now be told The Conversation (The Rev Kev)
Saudi Arabia Puts the Future of Cities on THE LINE Treehugger
The other virus that worries Asia BBC
Former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder Charged With Willful Neglect of Duty Over Flint Water Crisis WSJ
Russian Cosmism: a national mythology against transhumanism The Conversation
FASCIST BLINDNESS Irrussianality
The erotic origins of Italy’ most famous sweet BBC
#COVID-19
We may have only weeks to act before a variant coronavirus dominates the US MIT Technology Review
Initial Israeli data: First Pfizer shot curbs infections by 50% after 14 days Times of Israel
China’s vaccine falls short of

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Stunning Brick & Mortar Meltdown, Manhattan Style: The Collapse of Retail Rents Before & Now During the Pandemic

13 days ago

By Wolf Richter, editor of Wolf Street. Originally published at Wolf Street.
In the major shopping corridors in Manhattan, where sidewalks are lined by ground-floor shops, retail rents have been declining for years – and not just by a little, but by 20%, 30% or even over 40%, amid ballooning vacancies. The brick-and-mortar retail meltdown, Manhattan style. Then came the Pandemic. In the spring during the lockdown, as hospitals and morgues were overwhelmed, the market for street-level retail space froze up. Later in the year, retailers and landlords started making deals again, with “asking rents” falling by as much as 25% year-over-year, and by as much as 55% from the peak in prior years. And “taking rents” – rents actually agreed on – were reported to be even lower.
“These decreases are

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Let Them Eat Cake: COVID and Food Donations

13 days ago

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
COVID-19 has made hunger a reality for many in countries such as the U.S. and U.K., where food insecurity had been limited to the very poor.
Food banks are stretched, as they now must serve many more hungry  people.
Widening hunger has spurred food donations, private, corporate, and public. Yet many of these  – whether wittingly or not – are made in the spirit of Marie Antoinette.
Spaghettios and Pepper Pot Soup: My Childhood Donations to the Children of Bangladesh
Food donations all too often reflect the perceptions and motivations of the donor, and don’t accord with what the recipient wants or needs.
I remember my first experience with food

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Flint Water Crisis: Michigan AG Poised to Indict Ex-Gov Snyder, Other Officials, Later This Week, But on What Charges?

14 days ago

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
The Associated Press reports in Michigan plans to charge ex-Gov. Snyder in Flint water probe that former Michigan Rick Snyder will later be criminally charged for actions related to the Flint water crisis.
The AP report is sparse on key details, as are all the follow-on reports I have seen.
I turn to the Detroit News account, Michigan plans to charge ex-Gov. Snyder in Flint water probe, the most comprehensive I have seen so far:
Former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, top aide Rich Baird and former health director Nick Lyon have been told they will face criminal charges resulting from Flint’s water crisis, according to a source with knowledge of the

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Alaska Tribes, Conservation Groups, and Businesses Sue to Save the Tongass National Forest

December 28, 2020

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
In October, following Trump’s direct intervention and under pressure from Alaska state officials, the administration rescinded the ‘roadless rule’ in the Tongass National Forests, thus clearing the way to expand access of logging, mining, and other extractive industries.
The Trump administration has rolled back environmental protections, from the over touted yet actually modest recent levels  of protection other administrations. have pursued.
Trump’s policies have not proceeded unopposed. Last Wednesday, Reuters reported:
A coalition of Alaska Native tribes and environmentalists filed suit on Wednesday challenging a new Trump administration policy

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Links 12/28/2020

December 28, 2020

Why The Empire Strikes Back is overrated BBC
A Madagascar forest long protected by its remoteness is now threatened by it Mongabay (UserFriendly)
The art of fire: reviving the Indigenous craft of cultural burning The Narwhal
Reginald Foster, Vatican Latinist Who Tweeted in the Language, Dies at 81 NYT
Souvenir of the Lost World of the New York Jazz Club New York Review of Books
Willie Nelson Understands New Yorker
How Boz got his fizz Times Literary Supplement
10 geological discoveries that absolutely rocked 2020 Live Science (The Rev Kev)
Covid-19 wasn’t the only medical story this year. Here’s what you missed in 2020. NBC News (furzy mouse)
Boy Scouts of America accuse Girl Scouts of starting ‘war’ BBC (re/silC)
Is Society Collapsing? Counterpunch (chuck l)
The enduring lessons of a New

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How The Fracking Revolution Is Killing the U.S. Oil and Gas Industry

December 28, 2020

By Justin Mikulka, a freelance writer, audio and video producer living in Trumansburg, NY. Originally published at DeSmog Blog
After over a decade of the much-hyped U.S. fracking miracle, the U.S. oil and gas industry is having to deal with years of losses and falling asset values which has dealt the industry a serious financial blow. This is despite the fracking revolution delivering record oil and gas production for the past decade, peaking in 2019.
While the pandemic has hurt the industry, companies have also benefited from excessive bailouts from pandemic relief programs but these bailouts are a stop gap financial band-aid for the struggling industry.
The oil and gas industry has always required huge amounts of money to explore for and produce oil and gas but up until now the industry

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DoJ Launches Nationwide Lawsuit Against Walmart for Opioids Violations

December 27, 2020

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
Last Tuesday, the Department of Justice (DoJ) filed a civil lawsuit against Walmart alleging that the company “unlawfully dispensed controlled substances from pharmacies it operated across the country and unlawfully distributed controlled substances to those pharmacies throughout the height of the prescription opioid crisis.”
According to the DoJ:
The complaint alleges that this unlawful conduct resulted in hundreds of thousands of violations of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). The Justice Department seeks civil penalties, which could total in the billions of dollars, and injunctive relief.
….
The result of a multi-year investigation by the

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Links 12/27/2020

December 27, 2020

The Tramp’s Last Bow The Wire
15 Surprising Facts About Reindeer TreeHugger
Ephemeral edible: gingerbread monolith appears on San Francisco hilltop, then collapses Guardian (The RevKev)
Christmas in the grip of the Spanish Flu: As shops removed blackout curtains for the first time in four years in 1918, war-weary Britons faced the difficult decision over whether to see family during global pandemic that killed 50million  Daily Mail
22 photos reveal what Christmas looked like around the world in 2020 Business Insider (The Rev Kev)
A Great Deaf Bear London Review of Books
Quantum philosophy: Four ways physics will challenge your reality ScienceX (chuck l)
Ads All Tell Us To Kill Our Future. Worth Discussing? Counterpunch. Lee Camp.
Through a Lens Darkly: A Photographer’s Journey Through Los

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Analysis: Some Said the Vaccine Rollout Would Be a ‘Nightmare.’ They Were Right.

December 27, 2020

By Elisabeth Rosenthal, Editor-in-Chief, joined KHN in September 2016 after 22 years as a correspondent with The New York Times, where she covered a variety of beats from health care to environment and did a stint in the Beijing bureau. While in China, she covered SARS, bird flu and the emergence of HIV/AIDS in rural areas. Libby’s 2013-14 series, “Paying Till It Hurts,” won many prizes for both health reporting and its creative use of digital tools. Her book, “An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back” (Penguin Random House, 2017), was a New York Times best-seller and a Washington Post notable book of the year. She is a graduate of Stanford University and Harvard Medical School and briefly practiced medicine in a New York City emergency room

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You and I May Never Summit Everest But Microplastics Already Have

November 20, 2020

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
Regular readers no doubt have heard about the problems we have been having at Naked Capitalism this week. Mine have been particularly severe, though I understand some of the weirder ones have now migrated to Lambert as well.
So I have been slowed in my production of original posts, including one on the First Amendment that mentions the less than full-throated defence by the spineless man who later became our president. But I have not had stable enough access to finish that post to my satisfaction so I’m substituting this more whimsical one instead. Rest assured, you’ll get that First Amendment post soon. The issue isn’t going anywhere and will

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‘The Real Looting in America Is the Walton Family’: GAO Report Details How Taxpayers Subsidize Cruel Low Wages of Corporate Giants

November 19, 2020

By Jon Queally, staff writer, Common Dreams. Originally published at Common Dreams
Pinpointing a reality denounced as “morally obscene” by Sen. Bernie Sanders, a new government study shows how some of the nation’s largest and most profitable corporations—including Walmart, McDonald’s, Dollar General, and Amazon—feast upon taxpayer money by paying their employees such low wages that huge numbers of those workers throughout the year are forced to rely on public assistance programs such as Medicaid and food assistance just to keep themselves and their families afloat.
According to a statement from Sanders’ office, the study he commissioned the Government Accountability Office to carry out—titled “Millions of Full-time Workers Rely on Federal Health Care and Food Assistance Programs“—found

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Waste Watch: Carbon Emissions to Increase in the UK from Waste Disposal; Yet Another Reason We Need To Cease Making So Much Plastic

November 16, 2020

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
An article in Monday’s Guardian caught my eye, Increase in burning of plastic ‘driving up emissions from waste disposal’:
By 2030 the government’s push to increase incineration of waste will increase CO2 emissions by 10m tonnes a year, mostly from the burning of plastics, the groups said. They argue that the growth in energy-from-waste incineration means the UK will not be able to meet its commitment to net zero carbon emissions by 2050.
The coalition, which includes Extinction Rebellion’s zero waste group, Friends of the Earth, the UK Without Incineration Network (UKWIN), Greenpeace and the MP John Cruddas, says the expansion of waste incineration

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Links 11/16/2020

November 16, 2020

Revisiting “Seven Days in May” Counterpunch. I first read this book before I was a teenager. And I asked my uncle whether it was plausible. He was an Air Force pilot who flew missions in Vietnam, and retired as a full colonel, after finally serving as base commander at Hanscom Air Force Base near Boston. I was terrified by his response. Fascinated by the book then, but this TDS is getting overdone.
#COVID-19
Covid-19 Caused International Enrollments to Plummet This Fall. They Were Already Dropping. Chronicle of Higher Education
How Long Do I Need to Quarantine if I’m Exposed to Covid? WSJ
Damage to multiple organs recorded in ‘long Covid’ cases Guardian
Covid vaccine: Major new trial starts in UK BBC
Is it the end of the line for mass transit systems? FT
I’m seeing an industry disappear’:

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Save the Birds: Study Adds to Calls to Ban Dogs from Beaches During Shorebird Nesting Season

November 15, 2020

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
The Guardian reproduced a recent University of Valencia study that confirms another threat to nesting birds:
There is only one thing more terrifying for a nesting bird than a person walking nearby: when that two-legged beast is joined by a four-legged companion.
A study of how ground-nesting birds are disturbed on beaches in Spain has revealed how they are almost always scared from their nests by passing off-lead dogs, but seem unperturbed by motorbikes, helicopters and low-flying planes.
Walkers accompanied by dogs flushed Kentish plovers from the foreshore nests 80% of the time when walking on paths over the beach, compared with just 12.9% of the

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Links 11/15/2020

November 15, 2020

Happy Diwali!
How India Celebrated Diwali Amid Coronavirus Pandemic. See Pics NDTV
Cruise line resumed voyages in Caribbean. It’s not going well [Updated] Ars Technica
Fences Can Cause ‘Ecological Meltdown,’ Study Finds TreeHugger
Experience: my parachute failed Guardian
“Today I Learned’: 40 Interesting Things People Haven’t Learned At School Bored Panda
Government climate adviser urges Boris Johnson to act now to be ‘credible’ on crisis Independent
Egypt unveils scores of ancient coffins, statues found in Saqqara Al Jazeera
‘This Is a Really, Really Big Deal’: Michigan Gov. Moves to Shut Down Line 5 Pipeline to Protect Great Lakes Common Dreams
#COVID-19
New stats reveal massive NYC exodus amid coronavirus, crime NY Post
The Pandemic Winter Is Coming to New York, and It’s Going to Be

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Is Development for the World Bank Mainly Doing Business?

November 15, 2020

By Anis Chowdhury, Adjunct Professor at Western Sydney University & University of New South Wales (Australia), who held senior United Nations positions in New York and Bangkok and Jomo Kwame Sundaram, a former economics professor, who was United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Economic Development, and received the Wassily Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought. Originally published at the Inter Press Service
The World Bank has finally given up defending its controversial, but influential Doing Business Report (DBR). In August, the Bank “paused” publication of the DBR due to a “number of irregularities” after its much criticized ranking system was exposed as fraudulent.
Apparently, data from four countries – China, Azerbaijan, the UAE and Saudi Arabia – was

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Voting Turnout: Three Simple Ways to Get Out the Vote

November 2, 2020

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
One of many things I learned from Walter Dean Burnham during my years at MIT was the importance of voting turnout had on electoral outcome. Much of the history of electoral politics in the 20th century is  of efforts to depress turnout. This wasn’t limited to just trying to disenfranchise people of color – as serious as those efforts were.
But it also extended to efforts to suppress and undercount certain types of votes – those of people who lived in cities, for example.
Though most Americans are inured to our screwy electoral system, this situation looks very strange to the rest of the world, to say the least, as the NY Times highlighted in a

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11/2/2020

November 2, 2020

Virtue Signaling Over Corpses Craig Murray
Robert Fisk: Celebrated Middle East correspondent of The Independent dies aged 74 Independent
The Martin Papers Bookforum
A Nuts-And-Bolts Guide To Density People Actually Want American Conservative
We’re developing self-disinfecting surfaces that could curb the spread of infectious diseases Scroll How about good old copper?
5 Myths and Superstitions About Owls Big fan of owls. And snakes. (See my small collection of quirky jewellery.)
The cheap pen that changed writing forever BBC J still keep the faith and write with a fountain pen. And I allow myself an indulgence: a  new one, every time I start a new manuscript. I prefer the feel of pushing a heavy pen across the page. But this mode of composing doesn’t extend to the journalism – including

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As the World Watches US Election, the Appeal of America is Diminished

November 2, 2020

Jerri-Lynn here. And they say that as if it’s such a bad thing. Seriously, though, the election has made the defects of which many of those in the U.S. have long been aware apparent across the world.
There’s more than a touch of TDS to this screed, and I am conscious of how the mainstream media – and Democrats – never gave Trump a break. A fact of which my sister the Trump 2016 voter often makes me aware. So that perceptions of his deficiencies were transmitted, unchallenged, around the world. Yet still, there is much to ponder in this post,
By Liam Kennedy, Professor of American Studies, University College Dublin. Originally published at The Conversation.
A US presidential election always draws intense worldwide interest, in part due to the spectacle, but also because the leadership of

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Plastic Watch: Plastic Pushers Seek to Use Trade Negotiations to Rescind Plastic Bans

November 1, 2020

By Jerri-Lynn Scofield, who has worked as a securities lawyer and a derivatives trader. She is currently writing a book about textile artisans.
I’m going to take a break from COVID-19 and election coverage to write about a pernicious campaign by U.S.-based plastic pushers tp use the free trade mantra to dump more plastic in Africa (as well as the UK).
Readers with long memories will no doubt recall the infamous Larry Summers World Bank memo on pollution and developing countries.
More recently, many of these countries are slowly waking to the environmental costs of plastic  First by following China’s lead in not accepting plastic waste imports, and then by implementing their own single-use plastic bans, these countries have wakened to the dangers of excess plastic.
Now,as the plastic

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Links 11/1/2020

November 1, 2020

Sean Connery: James Bond actor dies aged 90 BBC
The First 50 Years of James Bond] Counterpunch. From the pen of the late great Alexander Cockburn.
Typhoon Goni weakens as it crosses Philippines, four dead Reuters
Typhoon Goni: Philippines hit by year’s most powerful storm BBC
70-year-old pulled out alive as Turkey quake death toll hits 51 Al Jazeera
Car-free neighbourhoods: the unlikely new frontline in the culture wars Guardian
In troubled times, a ritual walk can clear the mind and soothe the soul Guardian
Anne Applebaum’s Dinner Party, And Mine American Conservative
Why living with and tending plants is good for you BBC
California’s Hills Are Haunted by the Ghosts of Wind Energy’s Past Gizmodo
Let your children play in the green outdoors for just a month, watch immunity grow The Print
A

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Indian Pharma is Being Squeezed – and It’s Bad News for Drug Access in Developing Countries

November 1, 2020

Jerri-Lynn here. The key role Indian pharma plays in ensuring access to low-cost drugs for developing countries is especially important during the age of COVID-19, when big pharma is doing its best to promote high-cost, proprietary vaccines and treatments, regardless of their lack of history and questionable efficacy. Research into using low-cost generics is not part of the game plan. And the price of drugs is not just a concern for developing countries and is also not just limited to the pandemic,
By Thankom Arun, Professor of Global Development and Accountability, University of Essex, and Reji Joseph, Associate Professor of Economics, Institute for Studies in Industrial Development. Originally published at The Conversation.
India’s pharmaceutical industry is renowned for selling

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